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This week in higher ed

•A growing list of colleges and universities is turning to eBay to sell surplus items. Penn State University earned about $90,000 on eBay last year, auctioning off more than 100 items, including wrestling mats, pianos and an ice cream machine. (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 9/27/04)
•A growing list of colleges and universities is turning to eBay to sell surplus items. Penn State University earned about $90,000 on eBay last year, auctioning off more than 100 items, including wrestling mats, pianos and an ice cream machine. (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 9/27/04)

•Two University of South Florida admissions officers forced to resign last week for inflating standardized test scores told investigators other schools do the same thing. But USF officials did not treat all students the same. They manipulated the school's average by deleting 900 of the lowest SAT or ACT scores for this year's freshmen who took both tests, resulting in a boost to USF's academic profile. (St. Petersburg Times, 9/27/04)

•Carnegie Mellon University has received $20 million from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to help fund a new computer science building. (Ascribe, 9/24/04)

•University of Rhode Island President Robert L. Carothers is asking the state to invest $100 million annually for the next 10 years to create a $1 billion trust for the school. (The Providence Journal, 9/23/04)

•California State University-San Marcos President Karen Haynes announced it would be illegal to have “Fahrenheit 9/11” filmmaker Michael Moore on campus before the presidential election, since the public university is prohibited from spending state funds on partisan political activity or direct political advocacy. Civil liberty lawyers disagree, saying partisan figures have spoken at universities for years. (The San Diego Union Tribune, 9/23/04)

•University housing across the country is being upgraded as students demand more privacy and high-tech amenities. Many of the more than 16 million college students on U.S. campuses this fall are enjoying new or renovated dorms that offer single rooms, kitchenettes, microwaves, high-speed Internet connections, cable TV, fitness centers, food kiosks and washers and dryers. Even more important to students: air conditioning and bathrooms that are shared by no more than four people. (USA Today, 9/22/04)