Go back

This week in higher ed

•Three students were killed during the first week of classes as a fire swept through a fraternity house at the University of Mississippi Aug. 27. The house had undergone a routine fire inspection Aug. 17 that found problems, but no citation was issued. (The State/Associated Press, 8/30/04)
•Three students were killed during the first week of classes as a fire swept through a fraternity house at the University of Mississippi Aug. 27. The house had undergone a routine fire inspection Aug. 17 that found problems, but no citation was issued. (The State/Associated Press, 8/30/04)

•With college towns telling students they must cast absentee ballots where their parents live, many are fighting for the right to vote where they reside most of the year. The grassroots Students Voting Rights Campaign is calling for a “day of action” Sept. 23, urging students to register en masse—even if they meet with resistance. (CNN, 8/30/04)

•Three Massachusetts state colleges—Bridgewater, Framingham and Worcester—are requiring new students to own laptop computers this fall under an initiative that will spread to other schools in coming years. The colleges have a deal with Dell Inc. to offer discount packages to students. (The Boston Globe, 8/30/04)

•A Washington Post survey of physical education courses taught at 117 schools that field Division 1-A football teams found that nearly three-dozen universities award academic credit for participation on varsity sports teams. (The Washington Post, 8/27/04)

•Donald Trump has filed an application to secure a trademark for the Trump University name. (CNN, 8/27/04)

•Interim Auburn University President Ed Richardson continued his reorganization of the school's administrative staff with a wave of firings and demotions. His moves have raised questions about the role of an interim president. (Mobile Register, 8/27/04)

•Hilary Hight Daw, a former Kennesaw State University music professor, has been awarded a $1.06 million verdict. She claimed the Georgia school discriminated against her because of her gender in 1996, when the few women in the department were being treated unfairly in pay and promotions compared with their male counterparts. (Gwinnett Daily Post, 8/27/04)

•Major college sports programs are requiring fans to pay more than the ticket price to attend games. Of the top 25 schools in the preseason USA Today/ESPN Coaches' Poll, all but three require some or all of their season ticket holders to make a donation to keep their seats. (USA Today, 8/25/04)

•High-achieving, low-income students increasingly are being courted by selective universities, as officials try to make higher education more accessible. More than 80 percent of students from families earning more than $88, 675 annually go to college, compared with less than 60 percent of those whose families earn less than $35,066. (Sun Herald, 8/24/04)

•Real Networks is providing its Rhapsody Internet Jukebox service to more than 80,000 students at the University of California at Berkeley and the University of Minnesota. The discounted music program for college students probably will be expanded to other campuses next year. (The Mac Observer, 8/24/04)

•University of Texas officials predict another reduction in enrollment this fall—part of an ongoing effort to lower the student population from 52,000 to 48,000 by 2008. The ultimate goal is to improve the faculty-to-student ratio and overall educational environment. (Austin American-Statesman, 8/24/04)