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This week in higher ed

•Facing steeper tuitions, more parents are turning to counselors who specialize in appealing colleges financial-aid awards. These professional negotiators will contact the school and present legitimate reasons why it should reconsider the students aid package, such as a change in family structure or employment, high medical bills or a students recent improvement in grades or test scores. For the complete story, visit http://www.christiansciencemonitor.com/2004/0426/p13s02-wmgn.html (Christian Science Monitor, 4/26/04)
•Facing steeper tuitions, more parents are turning to counselors who specialize in appealing colleges' financial-aid awards. These professional negotiators will contact the school and present legitimate reasons why it should reconsider the student's aid package, such as a change in family structure or employment, high medical bills or a student's recent improvement in grades or test scores. For the complete story, visit http://www.christiansciencemonitor.com/2004/0426/p13s02-wmgn.html (Christian Science Monitor, 4/26/04)

•Enrollment in for-profit institutions is growing at three times the rate of nonprofit colleges and universities with 1 in 12 college students attending a for-profit institution. The University of Phoenix alone has 201,000 full-time adult students at 142 campuses and learning centers. (The New York Times, 4/26/04)

•Harvard is overhauling its curriculum for the first time in a quarter century to include more science, personal contact with professors and study time outside the U.S. (The Boston Globe, 4/27/04)

•Maryland football coach Ralph Friedgen is eligible to receive a $50,000 bonus annually if the entire football program avoids any trouble with law enforcement and the NCAA. (The Washington Times, 4/29/04)

•Former First Lady Nancy Reagan just said no to plans for a Ronald Reagan University in Colorado. (USA Today, 4/30/04)

•Mortimer B. Zuckerman, owner of U.S. News & World Report and The Daily News, is giving Harvard $10 million to support professionals who pursue public health, education and government degrees. (The New York Times, 4/30/04)

•Two University of Southern Mississippi professors suspended after checking into the university vice president's academic credentials will remain on salary for two years, but cannot teach or keep campus offices. University President Shelby Thames locked the profs out of their offices March 5 and initiated steps to fire them after he claimed they misused university computers and telephones to investigate allegations that university VP Angie Dvorak lied on her resume. (Associated Press, 5/3/04)

•Princeton University is proposing to fight grade inflation by limiting the number of A-minuses, As and A-pluses to no more than the top 35 percent of students in any course. (The New York Times, 5/3/04)