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University officials announce four new college deans

After nationwide searches and intensive interviews with final candidates, two new deans and two interim deans who now are permanent, are part of the leadership team at Austin Peay.

Dr. Gaines Hunt, who has been serving as interim dean of the College of Science and Mathematics, was selected as the best candidate for that position, joining Dr. James Diehr, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, who also had served in that position as an interim.
After nationwide searches and intensive interviews with final candidates, two new deans and two interim deans who now are permanent, are part of the leadership team at Austin Peay.

Dr. Gaines Hunt, who has been serving as interim dean of the College of Science and Mathematics, was selected as the best candidate for that position, joining Dr. James Diehr, dean of the College of Arts and Letters, who also had served in that position as an interim.

Joining Hunt and Diehr are Dr. Thomas Buttery, newly appointed dean of the College of Professional Programs and Social Sciences, and Dr. Charles Pinder, new dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Their full-time appointments begin July 1, 2004.

Buttery comes to the University from Fort Hays State University, Hays, Kan., where he was professor and dean of the College of Education and Technology since 2000.

He received a bachelor's degree in elementary education from Kean University, Union, N.J., followed by two master's degrees, both from Indiana University, Bloomington. Also from Indiana University, his Ed.D. is in curriculum and instruction with a minor in administration and supervision. In 1978-79, he held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Georgia, Athens.

Prior to his service at Fort Hays State University, he was professor and assistant for academic programs at East Carolina University, Greenville, from 1989-2000. From 1984-89, he was professor and department chair at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and from 1979-84, he was professor of teacher education at the University of Louisiana, Monroe. Between 1971-79, he taught at the University of Georgia and Indiana University.

Buttery has attained national prominence in his profession. At its 1997 national
conference, the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE) presented him a national writing award for his “Handbook of Research on Teacher Education.” Twice, he received the Distinguished Research Award in Teacher Education from the Association of Teacher Educators. The 2001 Education Excellence Award was given him by the FHSU College of Education for “inspirational leadership and innovation in the pursuit of excellence.”

In addition to his scholarly articles, Buttery wrote a chapter for “Perspectives on Early Childhood Education” and edited the “Handbook of Research in Teacher Education.”

Since 1994, Pinder has served as professor and chair of the department of technology for Northern Kentucky University, Highland Heights, Ky.

He earned his bachelor's degree in industrial arts education from Maryland State College, his master's in industrial education and technology from Kent State University and his doctorate in industrial education from the University of Maryland. He completed his postdoctoral work in design technology at Trent Polytechnic, England, in 1986.

His previous work experience includes serving as coordinator of the graduate program in technology education for Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, from 1978-94. He was Virginia Tech's director of the Governor's School of Technology from 1989-92, graduate coordinator from 1985-88 and associate director for the Standards for Industrial Arts/Technology Education Programs Project from 1978-85.

Pinder's professional honors include the International Technology Education Association's 2002 Award of Distinction, Kent State University's Distinguished School of Technology Alumni Award 1998 and Virginia Technology Education Association's Outstanding Work in the Area of Research Award in 1989. He was honored as a Paul Harris Fellow by The Rotary Foundation of Rotary International in 2001.

In addition to serving as principal investigator and project director for several funded research and development projects, Pinder has made numerous scholarly presentations and published articles in professional journals. He also wrote a chapter for “Technology Education for the 21st Century.”
—Rebecca Mackey