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Two alums tapped to PKP Academic Hall of Fame

During the 28th Induction Ceremony of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi Chapter 191 slated for 3-5 p.m., Thursday, April 22, two outstanding alumni of Austin Peay State University will be inducted into the societys Academic Hall of Fame.

From all the nominees, only two alumni per year can be inducted into the Academic Hall of Fame. The 2004 inductees are Dr. Ronald Miller and Joe E. Minor.
During the 28th Induction Ceremony of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi Chapter 191 slated for 3-5 p.m., Thursday, April 22, two outstanding alumni of Austin Peay State University will be inducted into the society's Academic Hall of Fame.

From all the nominees, only two alumni per year can be inducted into the Academic Hall of Fame. The 2004 inductees are Dr. Ronald Miller and Joe E. Minor.

Recipient of the 1999 National Intelligence Medal, Miller is a physicist and senior intelligence officer at the Defense Intelligence Agency's Missile and Space Intelligence Center, Redstone Arsenal, Ala. He manages the scientific and technical analyses of foreign-directed energy weapons systems. His intelligence analyses help to assess direct energy weapons threats to the U.S. Armed Forces.

Miller earned a bachelor's degree in math and physics from APSU in 1965. He received a master's degree in solid-state physics from Clemson University and a doctorate in applied physics from the Southeastern Institute of Technology, Huntsville, Ala.

He is on the Directed Energy Weapons Subcommittee of the U.S. Intelligence Community in Washington, D.C., serving as chair from 1990-98. As chair, he managed the national efforts for all direct energy weapons missions.

He now advises the Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Energy and Congress regarding foreign-directed energy weapon systems and technology.

A member of the American Physical Society and the Directed Energy Professional Society and an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, he has written more than 50 scientific articles and governmental reports.

In addition to the 1999 National Intelligence Medal of Achievement, Miller received the NASA Skylab Achievement Award, NASA New Technology Award, U.S. Army and Defense Intelligence Agency Outstanding Performance Awards and Exceptional Intelligence Analyst Award.

Minor, the second Academic Hall of Fame inductee, is a special agent and forensic scientist for the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, working in the Forensic Serology/DNA Section.

He is a member of the Violent Crime Response Team, a court-qualified expert in Tennessee and a nationally accredited forensic scientist. He also teaches forensic science at the National Forensic Academy and at Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tenn.

Minor earned a bachelor's degree in biology and chemistry and a master's in biology from APSU. He did postgraduate studies at the University of Virginia through the FBI Academy.

In association with Vanderbilt University, Minor helped develop the state's first forensic DNA-typing laboratory. He continues to research new DNA technologies and has spoken at professional meetings in Nashville and Atlanta on “Future Trends of DNA Technology.”

From 1977-84, he taught biology and chemistry in the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System. Now he speaks to such groups as the State Law Enforcement Academy and the TBI Criminal Investigator School. He has returned to APSU as a guest lecturer in chemistry, medical technology and honors biology seminars.

He has made presentations to the Tennessee District Attorney Conference, Nashville Bar Association, Tennessee Association of Clinical Microbiologists and a joint meeting of the Tennessee and Georgia Association of Medical Technologists. He participated in the Second International Symposium on the Forensic Aspects of DNA Analysis and the Seventh International Symposium of Human Identification.

For more information, contact Dr. Linda Thompson, president of The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi Chapter 191, by telephone, 7710.
—Dennie Burke