Go back

Tennessee Board of Regents approves program modifications for APSU

August 26, 2003

The Tennessee Board of Regents has approved modifications to Austin Peays 2003 fall curriculum for computer science and information systems, biology and teacher education preparation.

Students seeking a Bachelor of Science in computer science and information systems have two new concentrations added to the existing degree: Internet and Web technology, and database administration.
August 26, 2003

The Tennessee Board of Regents has approved modifications to Austin Peay's 2003 fall curriculum for computer science and information systems, biology and teacher education preparation.

Students seeking a Bachelor of Science in computer science and information systems have two new concentrations added to the existing degree: Internet and Web technology, and database administration.

The added concentrations are APSU's answer to growing job-market trends in the computer programming industry that focus on Web administration as opposed to programming.

“We did some research and found that positions for both of these concentrations were highly rated in the job market,” said Dr. Bruce Myers, chair and professor of computer science and information systems. The new concentrations, being offered in the new department of computer science and information technology, will be less math-oriented and more focused on the administration of Web sites and the processing of data for Web applications.

Those students seeking a Master of Science in biology also have been given a new option: following a concentration in radiologic science or clinical laboratory science. Two specializations are offered within the concentration in clinical laboratory science: clinical microbiology and management /administration.

Dr. Mary Mayo, director of the medical technology program and associate professor of biology, says that the concentrations were developed because of increased interest in health sciences and because of the career advancement that specializations such as administrative training in lab management could provide.

Similarly, fields such as radiology require educators in the field of radiologic technology to have a master's degree. Creating a concentration in radiologic science is an answer to the growing need for skilled technologists in this area.

"There are job shortages everywhere in these areas,” said Mayo. “We hope that the programs will fill a need for skilled laboratory technologists, radiologic technology educators and clinical laboratory managers.”

Curriculum also has been approved for students seeking their Add-On Education Endorsement Graduate Certificate in preparation for teaching in the areas of math, chemistry and special education.

The new concentrations in the computer science and information systems and biology departments appear in this year's 2003-04 graduate and undergraduate bulletins. Information regarding the new concentrations also may be found on APSU's Web site atwww.apsu.edu/csit/ for computer science and information systems and atwww.apsu.edu/biol_page for biology.

“It may take a few years to get all the courses developed for the new concentrations,” said Myers, who says there will be 12 courses in all for the two concentrations in Internet and Web technology and database administration.

This fall, two sections for CSCI 1005, the first core course required in the new concentrations, will be taught on the APSU campus. Another section will be taught in the Fall II term beginning in October. The class will be held at the Austin Peay Center at Fort Campbell.

For further information, telephone Myers at 7822 or Mayo at 7796.