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TBR honors Evans Harvill for support of APSU, higher education

During Austin Peays Annual Donor Dinner April 13, an alumnus and local attorney was honored for his longtime support of APSU and Tennessee higher education. More than 150 donors and scholarship students attended the event.

Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor Charles Manning presented the 2004 Chancellors Award for Excellence in Philanthropy to Evans Harvill. The award is based on generous support of a TBR institution and outstanding volunteer efforts to raise money for the institution.
During Austin Peay's Annual Donor Dinner April 13, an alumnus and local attorney was honored for his longtime support of APSU and Tennessee higher education. More than 150 donors and scholarship students attended the event.

Tennessee Board of Regents Chancellor Charles Manning presented the 2004 Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Philanthropy to Evans Harvill. The award is based on generous support of a TBR institution and outstanding volunteer efforts to raise money for the institution.

Before APSU President Sherry Hoppe took the podium to introduce this year's award recipient, Manning told the audience that Harvill “certainly meets both criteria at a high level.”

The son of the late Halbert Harvill, who was president of Austin Peay during 1946-66, Harvill literally grew up on the Austin Peay campus. After earning a bachelor's degree from Austin Peay and a jurisdoctorate from Vanderbilt University School of Law, he was admitted to the Tennessee Bar and the Federal District Court.

In 1949 after becoming a partner in the firm of Daniel, Harvill, Batson & Nolan, Harvill became involved in various worthwhile community organizations, but APSU has remained closest to his heart. Through the years, he has been a knowledgeable adviser to each Austin Peay president.

When the President's Emerging Leaders Program began in 1989, he and his wife, Peg, endowed two scholarships in that unique program. They were among the leaders of a group of local citizens whose successful lobbying prevented the planned demolition of Harned Hall.

In 1993, Harvill gave the keynote address for Austin Peay's Winter Commencement. He has served as president of the APSU National Alumni Association and a member of APSU's 75th Anniversary Steering Committee. During the 75th anniversary year, Harvill commissioned an art student to create a two-tiered view of Austin Peay that depicts changes in the campus since 1949.

Just as her husband has shared his talents with Austin Peay, Peg Harvill, an award-winning watercolorist, has painted portraits of APSU's historic buildings. Limited-edition prints of each are used by APSU as appreciation gifts to major donors. Among those major donors are the Harvills, who are members of The Austin Peay Society, which denotes the highest level of financial support.

“Through the years, the Harvills have been extremely generous to Austin Peay,” APSU President Sherry Hoppe said. “In addition to previous gifts, they have included Austin Peay in their estate plan in a marvelous way that will result in a significant number of scholarships. This University will benefit from their gracious philanthropy far into the future.”

Harvill is recognized statewide for his advocacy of Tennessee higher education. He was a
member of the Tennessee Board of Regents from 1991-98. He chaired the subcommittee that created articulation agreements among TBR institutionsan action that increased the number of educated Tennesseans, resulting in a better-educated workforce and a higher quality of life for all.

Harvill's professional leadership includes service as president and vice president of the local Bar Association as well as president, vice president and member of the board of governors of the Tennessee Bar Association. He is a charter fellow of the Tennessee Bar Foundation, serving as chair in 1991-92. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, American College of Trust and Estate Counsel and American College of Mortgage Attorneys.

In 1976, he was appointed as a justice of a Special Supreme Court for the state of Tennessee. He served in 1979 on the advisory committee for the selection of a federal judge and in 1982-83, he chaired the Board of Professional Responsibility of the Supreme Court of Tennessee.

He is a member of the American Bar Association, serving during 1980-88 as a member of the House of Delegates. Among his community leadership posts, he was president and national director of the Clarksville Junior Chamber of Commerce, a member of the local Chamber of Commerce and vice chair of Clarksville Memorial Hospital Board of Trustees.

The Harvills have a grown daughter, Katherine Evans Harvill of Maumelle, Ark.
—Dennie Burke