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Symposium focuses on free speech for people and the press

Is free speech really free? Panelists from the First Amendment Center, the Tennessee chapter of the American Civil Liberties Group and media representatives from The Tennessean and The Leaf-Chronicle will focus on answering this question during Austin Peay State University Student Publications First Amendment Symposium.
Is free speech really free? Panelists from the First Amendment Center, the Tennessee chapter of the American Civil Liberties Group and media representatives from The Tennessean and The Leaf-Chronicle will focus on answering this question during Austin Peay State University Student Publication's First Amendment Symposium.

The symposium will be held 10 a.m.-noon, Monday, April 12, in the Morgan University Center Ballroom. This is the first symposium to be hosted by Student Publications in conjunction with the communication and theatre department. The symposium will focus on creating dialogue that looks at free speech for individuals as well as for the media.

“What student wouldn't want to know what their personal freedoms are on and off this campus?,” says Kristy Galbraith, student publications adviser. “As Americans, we're empowered with First Amendment freedoms, and it's in our best interest to know what they are, understand how to use them and most importantly, know which freedoms are being challenged in court.

“This symposium will give students the opportunity to ask questions about those freedoms as well as freedoms of the press.”

Panelists include:

•David Hudson, research attorney for the First Amendment Center, Nashville, contributing editor for the American Bar Association's Preview of United States Supreme Court Cases and writer of books for young people on the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment;
•Hedy Weinberg, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Tennessee, winner of the 2003 Human Relations Award from the National Conference on Community and Justice—Nashville Chapter and recipient of the Tennessee Library Association's Freedom on Information Award for her advocacy work protecting and promoting the First Amendment;
•Jennifer Peebles, state editor for The Tennessean, president of the Middle Tennessee Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and member of the newly formed Tennessee Coalition for Open Government;
•Richard Stevens, executive editor of The Leaf-Chronicle, and
•Thomya Hogan, city editor for The Leaf-Chronicle.

Dr. David von Palko, professor of communications and director of the University's broadcast and cable operations will moderate the symposium.

For more information about the symposium, telephone Galbraith at 7375.
—Rebecca Mackey