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Students spared brunt of budget cuts; higher ed institutions won't be

February 11, 2003

Students won't see another round of tuition increases as higher education is forced to cut $100 million from its budget.

At a meeting with Gov. Phil Bredesen, Rich Rhoda, executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Chancellor Charles Manning and University of Tennessee President John W. Shumaker said they didn't know where the cuts would come from, but they were committed to coming up with cuts totaling 8.8 percent, as outlined by the Bredesen administration.
February 11, 2003

Students won't see another round of tuition increases as higher education is forced to cut $100 million from its budget.

At a meeting with Gov. Phil Bredesen, Rich Rhoda, executive director of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Chancellor Charles Manning and University of Tennessee President John W. Shumaker said they didn't know where the cuts would come from, but they were committed to coming up with cuts totaling 8.8 percent, as outlined by the Bredesen administration.

Bredesen said he was "surprised and delighted" that the cuts could be made "without really damaging the institutions."

According to the Feb. 8 edition of "The Tennessean," Manning said that travel, purchasing and even building temperatures would be reduced.

The cuts, which will be made in departments ranging from higher education to corrections to the arts, were made necessary by a $320 million deficit in the state's budget for this year's budget, and $500 million in next year's. The deficits are blamed largely on the climbing cost of TennCare, which is $260 million short this year.