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Students place eighth in regional mock trial competition, go on to nationals

February 26, 2003

A team of political science students placed eighth in the Washington University Midwest Regional Qualifying Tournament of the American Mock Trial Association (AMTA), earning a place in the national competition.

At the tournament in St. Louis, Mo., Ann B. Boyd of Springfield, Nicole E. Sipprell of Chattanooga, Benjamin C. Deacon of Gallatin, Sara E. Winn of Clarksville, Audrey R. Parham of Nashville and Ashley M. Reed of Dickson, played the roles of attorneys and witnesses in a fictitious civil case involving a hit-and-run accident.
February 26, 2003

A team of political science students placed eighth in the Washington University Midwest Regional Qualifying Tournament of the American Mock Trial Association (AMTA), earning a place in the national competition.

At the tournament in St. Louis, Mo., Ann B. Boyd of Springfield, Nicole E. Sipprell of Chattanooga, Benjamin C. Deacon of Gallatin, Sara E. Winn of Clarksville, Audrey R. Parham of Nashville and Ashley M. Reed of Dickson, played the roles of attorneys and witnesses in a fictitious civil case involving a hit-and-run accident.

Each team was given a list of facts and was judged on how well the evidence was presented and used within the trial.

The students switched arguing the side of plaintiff and defendant with 21 other teams from 12 different schools including The Air Force Academy, The University of Alabama-Birmingham, Bradley University, Columbia College, Eastern Illinois University, University of Missouri-Columbia, Quincy University, Rhodes University, St. Louis University, Sullivan University, Truman State University and Washington University.

APSU will join 16-20 other universities and colleges at the American Tournament of the AMTA April 11-13 in Richmond, Ky.

“This is our first appearance at nationals in 3-4 years,” said Dr. David Kanervo, professor and chair of political science. “I'm very proud of what they've accomplished. The team worked very hard and practiced outside of regular practices to be as successful as they were.”

AMTA was founded in 1985 for the purpose of giving undergraduate students an opportunity to learn first hand about the work of trial attorneys, understand the judicial system, develop critical thinking and enhance communication skills.