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Student erotic poetry reading planned in celebration of Valentine's Day

Austin Peay State University students will present a student erotic poetry reading at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 14 at the Ice House Café, 118 University Ave. between Michaels Pizza and Café 541.

Alicia Casey-Baum, a graduate student studying English, inspired the idea of an erotic poetry night in celebration of Valentines Day. The word erotica is derived from the Greek word eros, meaning of love.
Austin Peay State University students will present a student erotic poetry reading at 6 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 14 at the Ice House Café, 118 University Ave. between Michael's Pizza and Café 541.

Alicia Casey-Baum, a graduate student studying English, inspired the idea of an erotic poetry night in celebration of Valentine's Day. The word erotica is derived from the Greek word eros, meaning “of love.”

Zachary Matteson, a creative writing scholarship recipient through APSU's Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts, is striving to create artistic awareness. “Poetry is very much alive and still a vital and flourishing art,” says Matteson. “It's ever young, manifested in fresh and startling ways with every new poet.”

In addition to Matteson and Casey-Baum, student poetry readers will include Aaron Coleman, Megan Gregory, Candice Kirkland and Korie Shrum.

“It's really been my goal to build both a campus wide awareness of APSU's art scene, as well as a sense of community between artists, whatever their medium,” says Matteson.

“Besides hand-picking some of APSU's most talented poets, I also wanted to assemble a truly diverse group, both stylistically and socially. If we are going to produce an entire evening devoted to love in all its colors, we want to reflect that in our readers as well.”

When asked what he hopes audience members will take away from the reading, Matteson says, “We hope to engage the audience, to submerse them in verse. Even if you leave the reading thinking, ‘I didn't get it,' hopefully, you will follow that thought with, ‘but I still got something out of it.'”

The reading is free and open to the public. However, it should be noted that the poems to be read are considered “erotic” and perhaps unsuitable for children.

For more information, telephone (931) 201-7031. — Crissy Laubach-Young