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Schlanger to lecture about art and science Jan. 29

Professor of Art Gregg Schlangers most recent work examines environmental issues through installations and community public art projects. In one such project, he addressed the disappearance of the Columbia River Basin sockeye salmon with the placement of 240 salmon cutouts, two to eight feet in length, along a 500-yard stretch of Redfish Lake, Boise, Idaho.

My recent projects have reinforced my objectives to collaborate with the sciences, says Schlanger. It is exciting for me as an artist to work with biologists who share a similar passion.
Professor of Art Gregg Schlanger's most recent work examines environmental issues through installations and community public art projects. In one such project, he addressed the disappearance of the Columbia River Basin sockeye salmon with the placement of 240 salmon cutouts, two to eight feet in length, along a 500-yard stretch of Redfish Lake, Boise, Idaho.

“My recent projects have reinforced my objectives to collaborate with the sciences,” says Schlanger. “It is exciting for me as an artist to work with biologists who share a similar passion.”

Schlanger will discuss his work during the 2004 Faculty Lecture Series sponsored by Austin Peay's department of art. The lecture takes place at noon, Thursday, Jan. 29, in the Customs House Museum and Cultural Center Auditorium, Clarksville.

An 11-year Clarksville resident, Schlanger is working on his first major local project, “Renewed Visions: The Cumberland River Basin Project.” To view his previous work, visit www.sockeye.org.

The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, telephone 7333.
—Terry Stringer