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Is the SAT going the way of the dodo?

Once upon a time, the SAT score was the all-important magic number for high school students looking to get into college. However, according to Psychology Today, there is a growing trend among private colleges not to require an SAT score at all.
Once upon a time, the SAT score was the all-important magic number for high school students looking to get into college. However, according to Psychology Today, there is a growing trend among private colleges not to require an SAT score at all.

Although the SAT is the nation's oldest and most popular standardized test for college admissions, critics says it's a “poor predictor of women's non-native English speakers and older students' academic performance in college.” There also is controversy over the disparity between test-takers who can afford preparation courses and those who can't.

According to Robert Schaeffer, public education director of the National Center for Fair & Open Testing, about 700 colleges and universities have dropped the test as an admissions requirement. This includes public schools like the University of Texas system, which doesn't require standardized test scores from Texas seniors graduating in the top 10 percent of their high school class.