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Randall lectures on spiritual values

Dr. Albert Randall, professor of philosophy, presents a series of lectures and discussions exploring fundamental spiritual values shared by the worlds foremost religions.

Based on the Beatitudes of the New Testament, the series includes seven meetings from 6-7 p.m., Wednesdays, Jan. 19-March 2, at Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 410 Golf Club Lane, Clarksville.

The series schedule is as follows:

Jan. 19: The Poor in Spirit
Jan. 26: Those Who Mourn
Feb. 2: The Meek
Feb. 9: Those Who Hunger and Thirst for Righteousness Dr. Albert Randall, professor of philosophy, presents a series of lectures and discussions exploring fundamental spiritual values shared by the world's foremost religions.

Based on the Beatitudes of the New Testament, the series includes seven meetings from 6-7 p.m., Wednesdays, Jan. 19-March 2, at Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 410 Golf Club Lane, Clarksville.

The series schedule is as follows:

Jan. 19: “The Poor in Spirit”
Jan. 26: “Those Who Mourn”
Feb. 2: “The Meek”
Feb. 9: “Those Who Hunger and Thirst for Righteousness”
Feb. 16: “The Merciful”
Feb. 23: “The Pure in Heart”
March 2: “The Peacemakers”

According to Randall, the purpose of the series is to encourage compassion and tolerance among people of varying ethnic backgrounds, cultural traditions and religious beliefs.

“Over and over again, the world's great religions affirm the importance of values such as honesty, generosity, compassion, kindness and justice,” he says. “For Christians, the most inspirational statement of these spiritual values is the opening of the Sermon on the Mount, the Beatitudes, but the translations found in the King James and Revised Standard versions often are misleading and unclear.”

Each session, Randall will attempt to provide greater understanding of the Beatitudes by examining numerous translations, considering various English meanings of Greek terms used in the New Testament, investigating spiritual vices and studying examples of the Beatitudes in life.

Sessions will conclude with discussion and, if time allows, limited observations about the Beatitudes in Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism.

The series is free and open to the public.
—Terry Stringer