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Professor, expert on Islam to speak, debut new book at HCC on Feb. 23

An Austin Peay State University professor of philosophy and religion, who has earned an international reputation as an expert on world religions, especially Islam, has been invited to speak at Hopkinsville Community College (HCC).

Dr. Albert Randalls talk, titled Do the Worlds Religions Share a Common Core? is slated to begin at 12:05 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 23 in the HCC Auditorium. The talk, which is free and open to the public, is part of HCCs Religion and Philosophy Club Speakers Series.
An Austin Peay State University professor of philosophy and religion, who has earned an international reputation as an expert on world religions, especially Islam, has been invited to speak at Hopkinsville Community College (HCC).

Dr. Albert Randall's talk, titled “Do the World's Religions Share a Common Core?” is slated to begin at 12:05 p.m., Thursday, Feb. 23 in the HCC Auditorium. The talk, which is free and open to the public, is part of HCC's Religion and Philosophy Club Speakers Series.

Randall's new book, “Strangers on the Shore: The Beatitudes in World Religions” was released by Peter Lang Publishers in January 2006. Its purpose is to encourage respect for all belief systems by exploring the spiritual virtues shared by the world's great religions.

In a previous statement, Randall said, “Although Christians and Muslims disagree on the divinity of Jesus, the New Testament and the Qur'an affirm a common set of spiritual virtues. These same virtues are found in Hinduism and Buddhism.”

“Strangers on the Shore” explores the virtues in the Beatitudes as expressed in the New Testament, the Qur'an, the Hindu Bhagavad Gita and the writings and traditions of Buddhism.

Randall has authored two other books“Theologies of War and Peace Among Jews, Christians and Muslims” (1998) and “The Mystery of Hope in the Philosophy of Gabriel Marcel, 1888-1972: Hope and Homo Viator” (1993).

In 2005, Randall conducted several sessions on Islam and Arabic cultures for brigades of the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) before they redeployed to the Middle East.

Randall, who has taught at APSU 35 years, said, “It has become more and more important for us to understand not only other religions, but particularly Islam. It's about getting past stereotypes.”

Randall will be making similar talks throughout the region over the next year. To invite him to speak, telephone (931) 221-7479 or e-mail randalla@apsu.edu.

“Strangers on the Shore” as well as Randall's other two books and a collection of his 104 articles on religion previously published in The Leaf-Chronicle are available through special order by the Book and Supply Store at APSU.

To place an order, telephone Pam Allen at (931) 221-7919. — Dennie B. Burke