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‘Principles of peace': 2008 Army War College convenes this week at APSU

For more than 2,000 years, such military leaders as Sun Tzu, Julius Caesar, Napoleon Bonaparte and George Patton have studied and endorsed myriad principles of war until, over the centuries, they have been distilled to nine core principles.

On the flip side, during this weeks conference at Austin Peay State University, some of the nations top military thinkers, along with academicians who are students of military affairs, will be hammering out what they hope will become Principles for Winning the Peace.
For more than 2,000 years, such military leaders as Sun Tzu, Julius Caesar, Napoleon Bonaparte and George Patton have studied and endorsed myriad principles of war until, over the centuries, they have been distilled to nine core principles.

On the flip side, during this week's conference at Austin Peay State University, some of the nation's top military thinkers, along with academicians who are students of military affairs, will be hammering out what they hope will become “Principles for Winning the Peace.”

On Feb. 13-15, APSU will host an academic conference for the Strategic Studies Institute and the U.S. Army War Collegea coup, according to Dr. Dewey Browder, the principal conference coordinator and chair of the APSU Department of History and Philosophy. A longtime believer in the mission of the U.S. War College, Browder has been working for several years to bring this “think tank” to APSU.

Titled “Stability Operations and State-Building: Continuities and Contingencies,” the 2008 meeting will be a working conference limited to 75 participants. Speakers will include several prominent authors, officials from the Department of the Army, representatives from non-government organizations and academic experts.

“We will look at the theoretical, intellectual and moral foundation of state-building as derived from the Age of Enlightenment, ethical norms and religious values from various societies,” Browder said. “We will hear success stories from the past and consider possible models for the future, and we will examine contemporary practices as told by military officers.”

“It is not a conference about when or whether to go to war,” Browder stressed. “We will attempt to find some core principles of state-building that will enable America to ‘win the peace' in future state-building operations.”

Guest speakers will include Dr. Thomas Barnett, internationally renowned author of “The Pentagon's New Map,” Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army George Dunlop, John Robb, author of “Brave New War,” and James Carafano of The Heritage Foundation.

Although all conference sessions are working sessions for invited participants, others may observe on a space-available basis.

The public is invited to a talk by Barnett, slated for 8-9:30 a.m., Thursday, Feb. 14 in APSU's Clement Auditorium. After the talk, Barnett will remain behind to answer questions as conference participants continue with the day's agenda in the Morgan University Center.

For a full conference agenda and a list of participants and their brief biographies, click on the Web link:
http://www.apsu.edu/history/

For more information, contact Browder by telephone at (931) 221-7924 or e-mail browderd@apsu.edu or Dr. Tom O' Connor, program manager of APSU's homeland security program and conference co-coordinator, by telephone at (931) 221-1477 or by e-mail oconnort@apsu.edu.-- Dennie B. Burke