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Plaudits

Dr. David Kanervo, professor of political science, was scheduled to speak today to the Montgomery County Republic Women.

His topic was Differences Between Democrats and Republicans.

Dr. Steven Hamilton, professor of biology and principal investigator in the Center of Excellence for Field Biology, and Craig Emerson, graduate research assistant in the center and adjunct instructor in biology, presented a paper at the 54th annual meeting of the North American Benthological Society, June 4-8 in Anchorage, Alaska.
Dr. David Kanervo, professor of political science, was scheduled to speak today to the Montgomery County Republic Women.

His topic was “Differences Between Democrats and Republicans.”

Dr. Steven Hamilton, professor of biology and principal investigator in the Center of Excellence for Field Biology, and Craig Emerson, graduate research assistant in the center and adjunct instructor in biology, presented a paper at the 54th annual meeting of the North American Benthological Society, June 4-8 in Anchorage, Alaska.

The paper, titled “The effects of stormwater runoff and combined sewer overflows on benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in urban streams,” presented results from research funded by a contract from the Clarksville Department of Gas and Water.

Hamilton also was invited to serve as a taxonomic expert on caddisfly larvae for the annual Taxonomy Fair.

Emerson served on the graduate student committee of NABS and was invited to serve on the long-range planning committee. He will begin work on his Ph.D. in biology at the University of Louisville this fall.

Here is the link to the published abstract: http://www.benthos.org/database/allnabstracts.cfm/db/Anchorage2006abstracts/id/508.

Dr. Jaime R. Taylor, chair and professor of physics, and Dr. Alex King, associate professor of physics and astronomy, have co-authored a paper for the Computing in Science and Engineering journal.

The professors also presented their paper, titled “Using Computational Methods to Reinvigorate an Undergraduate Physics Curriculum,” recently in Syracuse, N.Y.

Dr. Sharon Yates, professor of education, taught a class in this summer's Teach Tennessee, a two-week, state-authorized accelerated teacher training program that enables professionals without teaching degrees to become math, science and foreign language teachers in grades 7-12.

Dr. Becky J. Starnes, assistant professor of professional studies, and Dr. Stephen A. Truhon, assistant professor of psychology, had “A Primer on Organizational Commitment” published in May 2006 by The Human Development and Leadership Division of the American Society of Quality (ASQ).

More than 3,000 copes of their work were distributed at the 2006 ASQ World Conference on Quality and Improvement and to Human Development and Leadership Division members.

Barry Jones, assistant professor of art, was selected for exhibition in the FILE 2006 Electronic Language International Festival, Aug. 14-Sept.3 in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

The International Festival of Electronic Language is a nonprofit cultural organization designed to disseminate and develop arts, technologies and scientific research through exhibitions, debates, lectures and courses.

Kell Black, professor of art, was an artist in residence throughout July at the Oregon College of Art and Craft in Portland.

Charlie T. Struckel, an officer with Campus Police, attended several training sessions since March.

Struckel most recently became certified to teach courses through both the Tennessee Emergency Management Agency and the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

In May, Struckel received national certification as a specialist in crime prevention through environmental design from the American Crime Prevention Institute in Louisville, Ky. He also was certified at the Tennessee Law Enforcement Training Academy in Nashville to be an instructor regarding domestic violence and sexual assault and abuse cases.

At the academy in March, Struckel earned certification to teach courses approved by Peace Officers Standards and Training.