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Plaudits

The Tennessee Board of Regents has invited three chairs from APSU to join the Regents Academic Leadership Institute (RALI) for 2006-07.

The three chairs are Dr. Don Dailey, biology; Dr. Leni Dyer, communication and theatre; and Joyce Hargove, social work, political science and sociology.

RALI offers participants an opportunity to learn about leadership styles and TBR functions, as well as network with other academic leaders.
The Tennessee Board of Regents has invited three chairs from APSU to join the Regents Academic Leadership Institute (RALI) for 2006-07.

The three chairs are Dr. Don Dailey, biology; Dr. Leni Dyer, communication and theatre; and Joyce Hargove, social work, political science and sociology.

RALI offers participants an opportunity to learn about leadership styles and TBR functions, as well as network with other academic leaders.

Dr. Phillip Kemmerly, professor of geology, presented a paper, titled “Chrono-Geomorphic Mapping of Doline Field Evolution: Potential for Dating Karst Terranes” at the Geological Society of America Southeastern Section meeting March 24 in Knoxville.

To see his published abstract on this talk, visit http://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2006SE/finalprogram/abstract_100209.htm.

In addition, Kemmerly will have a paper, titled “Modeling Doline Populations with Logistic Growth Functions,” published in 2007 in Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, the premier journal for researchers in geomorphology.

Kemmerly's paper involves constructing a mathematical model to describe the geologic processes resulting in sinkhole development in Tennessee and Kentucky.

Philenese Slaughter, assistant professor of library administration, presented “Tennessee's Invisible Native American Population” at the Tennessee Department of Human Services Diversity University Conference on March 15-17 at Falls Creek Falls State Park in Pikeville.

Eta Sigma Phi classics honor society sponsored the first annual Classics Day Triathlon. Students from four high schools in Montgomery County came to Austin Peay to compete.

Following a lecture by Dr. Tim Winters, associate professor of languages and literature, students divided into groups to do either an art project or a skit based on a Greek myth. The final event was a trivia contest, televised on Channel 99, about the ancient Roman world and the Latin language.