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Plaudits

An article and photo of Dr. Gregory Zieren, professor of history, made the front page of the Nov. 14 edition of the Kentucky New Era. Last Friday, during a Veterans Day ceremony at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery-West, Zieren told the audience about the work he and his students are doing to collect stories from veterans of World War II and the Korean War for the Library of Congress Veterans Oral History Project. The Library of Congress began collecting stories in 2001a year after Zierens students began interviewing. An article and photo of Dr. Gregory Zieren, professor of history, made the front page of the Nov. 14 edition of the Kentucky New Era. Last Friday, during a Veterans Day ceremony at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery-West, Zieren told the audience about the work he and his students are doing to collect stories from veterans of World War II and the Korean War for the Library of Congress' Veterans Oral History Project. The Library of Congress began collecting stories in 2001a year after Zieren's students began interviewing. Zieren, who is head of the project for this area, said, “When (veterans) share their specific experience, it is wonderful. We've recorded some amazing stories.” Information about the oral history project is available at the Library of Congress' Web site: www.LOC.gov/vets.

At the kick-off of the Faces of Valor exhibit in the Montgomery County Courthouse, Dr. Bert Randall, professor of philosophy, paid tribute to Dr. Preston Hubbard, APSU professor emeritus of history, who was present for the opening. Hubbard, a World War II prisoner who survived the infamous Bataan Death March, wrote the book, “Apocalypse Undone,” about his experiences as a Japanese POW. “There are heroes all around us,” Randall said. “We often just look in the wrong places. There is a time (in his philosophy class) when we talk about the human spirit. I talk about one of my heroesPreston Hubbard.”