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Only one in nation, APSU student chosen as Carter Center intern

An Austin Peay State University political science major, Carrie Burggraf, has been awarded a summer internship at the Carter Center, founded in Atlanta in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn.

Burggraf, a junior from Marion, Ohio, came to APSU on a track scholarship. Now she is preparing to spend the summer in Atlanta while working in the Carter Center Peace Program.
An Austin Peay State University political science major, Carrie Burggraf, has been awarded a summer internship at the Carter Center, founded in Atlanta in 1982 by former U.S. President Jimmy Carter and his wife, Rosalynn.

Burggraf, a junior from Marion, Ohio, came to APSU on a track scholarship. Now she is preparing to spend the summer in Atlanta while working in the Carter Center Peace Program.

According to Dr. David Kanervo, professor and chair of the department of political science, The Princeton Review listed the Carter Center internship as one of the top 100 internships in America.

Kanervo said, “There is only one intern a semester selected from the entire countryand Carrie got it. This is a major internship.”

The Carter Center Web site says the Peace Program intern works within the office of the associate executive director, helping with administrative and substantive issues affecting Center operations in the areas of democracy, human rights, conflict resolution, the Americas and China.

For her summer internship, Burggraf will earn six college credits. She's pleased with thatbut more gratified to begin working in an arena that owns her hearthuman rights.

She admits her world travels are limited, although she went with a family member on a two-week trip to China during her freshman year in high school.

“I had been so naive,” she says. “Our travels around China were so eye-opening. That trip tied together my interest in human rights with foreign affairs.”

After she returns from the Carter Center internship and completes her senior year at APSU, what then? Perhaps law school.

“I do know I want to do something I love---helping others by promoting human rights and peace worldwide,” she says. She's hopeful her summer at the Carter Center will help her develop her somewhat vague aspirations into a specific goal.

Regardless of the career she ultimately enters, she's appreciative of two professors who went the extra mile to help her get the Carter Center internshipKanervo and Dr. Mickey Wadia, professor of languages and literature.

“Besides their letters of recommendations, Dr. Kanervo and Dr. Wadia helped me prepare my application,” says Burggraf. “And I was told by officials at the Carter Center that my strong application materials were key to my getting the internship.” -- Dennie B. Burke