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News in higher education: National highlights with focus on local institutions

A joint release was disseminated Nov. 11, 2005, from the heads of the Tennessee Board of Regents, University of Tennessee and Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, endorsing the statement on student academic freedom developed by the American Council on Education (ACE). In the joint release, the three leaders said, It is important to codify the principles that guide us in ensuring that our students, as well as our faculty, have the freedom to voice a wide diversity of opinions and views without fear of reprisal.
A joint release was disseminated Nov. 11, 2005, from the heads of the Tennessee Board of Regents, University of Tennessee and Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association, endorsing the statement on student academic freedom developed by the American Council on Education (ACE). In the joint release, the three leaders said, “It is important to codify the principles that guide us in ensuring that our students, as well as our faculty, have the freedom to voice a wide diversity of opinions and views without fear of reprisal.”

East Tennessee State University's master of public health curriculum was recognized as one of the most innovative in the country. ETSU was chosen to receive the Delta Omega Award for Innovative Public Health Curriculum for 2005. Previous recipients include Johns Hopkins University and Boston University. (Johnson City Press, Nov. 6, 2005)
Dyersburg State Community College celebrated a groundbreaking ceremony of Phase III of the DSCC-Covington campus. The expansion, which is expected to cost about $6 million, was funded by the state legislature. It will add 33,000 square feet to the Covington facility, more than doubling the size of the campus, and will include a 250-seat lecture hall, nursing lab, EMT lab, surgical lab, learning resource center and several classrooms. (Covington Leader, Nov. 8, 2005)

The UT Center for Business and Economic Research is surveying Tennesseans about their attitudes on education. State Comptroller (and APSU alumnus) John Morgan requested the survey as a way to help develop public policy strategies for K-12 and higher education. “When you look at the data, it's clear that the kind of jobs that are going to be desirablejobs with high pay and high skillsare going to require higher levels of education,” Morgan said. “What we're trying to figure out is how do we move the state forward to meet the challenge.” (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Nov. 10, 2005)

To stem the flood of jobs leaving America for other countries, schools in the United States need to re-emphasize math and science courses, according to a new report from the National Academy of Sciences. The report was commissioned in the spring by U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., former University of Tennessee president and U.S. education secretary. The report has been sent to the White House. Offering 20 suggestions, the report calls for recruiting 10,000 new science and math teachers each year by providing college scholarships in math, science and engineering in exchange for a five-year commitment to teach in public schools; increasing federal investment in math and science research by 10 percent a year over the next seven years; creating an agency in the Department of Energy to support out-of-the-box, transformational energy-research by universities, industry and government; and providing $500,000 annually in research grants to the nation's brightest young researchers. Other recommendations are for more scholarships, tax credits and incentives to employers in the science and technology sector and one-year visa extensions for foreign students, earning engineering or science doctorates, so they can find work in the United States. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Nov. 5, 2005)