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John Wallace, who served Sumner County for many years as a physician, has made the largest donation in the history of the Volunteer State Community College.

Wallace donated $778,795 to fund Allied Health scholarships. Wallace, who died in 1998, helped establish the first hospital and nursing home in Gallatin. It was the latest in a long string of contributions. The latest gift settles Wallaces estate.
John Wallace, who served Sumner County for many years as a physician, has made the largest donation in the history of the Volunteer State Community College.

Wallace donated $778,795 to fund Allied Health scholarships. Wallace, who died in 1998, helped establish the first hospital and nursing home in Gallatin. It was the latest in a long string of contributions. The latest gift settles Wallace's estate.

Three earlier gifts were for $500,000, $250,000 and another for $250,000. The combined total provided for the Dr. John Wallace Endowment is close to $1.8 million. (The Tennessean, Feb. 16, 2006)

Nearly 21 percent of Tennessee Lottery scholarship recipients are from families who make more than $100,000 annually, according to a Tennessee Higher Education Commission report.

About 8 percent of Tennessee households fall into that income bracket, according to the report.
“The goal of the scholarship is to provide college access to Tennesseans, and there were no disclaimers in that definition of Tennesseans," said Dr. Brian Noland with the THEC.

The report examines a variety of demographics for lottery scholarship recipients from the 2004-05 school year, the first year the awards were available. The data, presented to the commission at a meeting at the end of January, is part of a fuller report that Noland will give to lawmakers later this month.

The average lottery scholarship recipient is a white female from a household with income of $60,000 a year or more, according to the report. Other findings include the following:
• About 4,700, or 16 percent, of scholarship recipients had to take at least one remedial class their freshman year.
• The students who lost their scholarships were likely to be from a low-income family and enrolled at a community college.
• The majority of students who lost their scholarships, 62 percent, earned a 21 or below on the ACT.
• The number of Tennesseans attending historically popular colleges in neighboring states decreased across the board.
• Eighty-four percent of the lottery recipients were white, 10 percent were black, 1 percent Hispanic and 2 percent Asian, according to the report.
• The state's population is 80 percent white, 16 percent black, 2 percent Hispanic and 1 percent Asian. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Feb. 12, 2006)

Through a partially opened underground door near Luxor, Egyptian authorities gave a peek last week into the first tomb uncovered in the Valley of the Kings since King Tut's in 1922.

A University of Memphis team discovered the tomb by accident while working on a nearby site.
The find already has attracted worldwide attention from the media and Egyptology enthusiasts, said Dr. Patricia Podzorski, curator of Egyptian art at the U of M Institute of Egyptian Art and Archaeology. The institute sponsored an unrelated project that led to the discovery.

Dr. LoreLei Corcoran and a U of M graduate student, Sharon Nichols, joined team leader DR. Otto Schaden in Egypt in December on his 14-year-old excavation o a known tomb. While clearing rubble from King Amenmesse's tomb, they unearthed the 63rd tomb to be found in the Valley of the Kings. But experts said the tomb, believed to be some 3,000 years old, does not appear to be for a pharaoh. (The Commerical Appeal, Feb. 11, 2006)