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Gov. Phil Bredesen says the resignation of Loren Crabtree as chancellor of the University of Tennessee's Knoxville campus was "a smart thing for everybody," given the tension between Crabtree and UT President John Petersen.

In an interview, Bredesen also said he backs Petersen's stance on university governance but is skeptical of proposals to expand student enrollment at UT Knoxville.

"I have a great deal of confidence in Dr. Petersen," Bredesen said, adding that "I was certainly aware there had been some tension for a long time" between the UT president and Crabtree. Gov. Phil Bredesen says the resignation of Loren Crabtree as chancellor of the University of Tennessee's Knoxville campus was "a smart thing for everybody," given the tension between Crabtree and UT President John Petersen.

In an interview, Bredesen also said he backs Petersen's stance on university governance but is skeptical of proposals to expand student enrollment at UT Knoxville.

"I have a great deal of confidence in Dr. Petersen," Bredesen said, adding that "I was certainly aware there had been some tension for a long time" between the UT president and Crabtree.

The governor said the differences between the two were apparent when both accompanied him and other officials on a trade mission to China last fall.
"Nothing improper said, you know, or uncivil or anything like that. Just tension," Bredesen said in describing the relationship of the two men.

"From what I understand, they had two different conceptions of the university, particularly centered around where the athletics belong and where the School of Agriculture belongs. Probably other kinds of things," he said.
As governor, Bredesen sits as chairman of the UT Board of Trustees. He also appoints members of the board.(Knoxville News Sentinel, Jan. 20, 2008)

Half the students who earn a Tennessee's lottery scholarship lose it after their freshman year, and more than two-thirds lose it by their senior year.

The findings come from the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, which released its annual report on the lottery scholarship last week. The numbers are almost identical to the commission's report last year, when state lawmakers considered changing the scholarship requirements but ultimately did not.

Now, with the same results, legislators might be pushed further to lower the grade-point average needed to retain the scholarship.

Only 32 percent of freshmen maintain their lottery scholarships by the time they would typically be seniors. The data is based on the class that entered in Fall 2004, the first year the lottery scholarship was offered.

Among students who lost the scholarship last year, nearly two-thirds stayed in school. The report showed the higher a student's family income, the more likely he or she was to remain in school.

Currently, students must have at least a score of 21 on the ACT college entrance test or a 3.0 GPA in high school to qualify for the $4,000 annual HOPE scholarship, and maintain a 2.75 through the first 24 semester hours a typical year's worth of classes. (The Tennessean, Jan. 24, 2008)