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Some Tennessee universities want to attract more high school students seeking college credit to their campuses, at least in part to get the inside track on recruiting the most motivated students.
Some Tennessee universities want to attract more high school students seeking college credit to their campuses, at least in part to get the inside track on recruiting the most motivated students.

Several community colleges have offered lower-division dual enrollment classes for years, giving students the chance to receive high school and college credit. Now, Middle Tennessee State University Vice President Bob Glenn wants state legislators to make part of the $400 million lottery surplus available for dual enrollment grants for any class at any Tennessee university, public or private.

"What we perceive we'll bring to our campus are (courses like) upper-level mathematics, foreign languages beyond the second or third year," Glenn said.
"When the lottery pays the tuition, we're happy to make excess seats on campus available, and everybody in the process wins."

The biggest winners could be the universities, who could show off their signature programs. Students might later enroll at their dual enrollment universities and be more likely to graduate thanks to their experience, Glenn said.

MTSU and other schools are diversifying their lower-division offerings to draw in more students. Austin Peay State University offers psychology and sociology classes, and MTSU just opened its introductory aerospace course to students in Williamson County in an agreement with the school system there. (The Tennessean, Jan. 16, 2008)