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News in higher education

U.S. Rep. Bart Gordon, D-Murfreesboro, and U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., have secured $1.8 million in federal funding to help Middle Tennessee State University enhance its science, aviation and health programs and establish a transportation hub at the campus.

"This funding will help MTSU augment its programs, conduct research and further initiatives that will impact not only the university, but also the surrounding community and entire state," said Gordon, an MTSU alumnus, in a news release.
U.S. Rep. Bart Gordon, D-Murfreesboro, and U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., have secured $1.8 million in federal funding to help Middle Tennessee State University enhance its science, aviation and health programs and establish a transportation hub at the campus.

"This funding will help MTSU augment its programs, conduct research and further initiatives that will impact not only the university, but also the surrounding community and entire state," said Gordon, an MTSU alumnus, in a news release.

The university funding was included in a comprehensive bill providing annual funding to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Transportation and science-related agencies, such as NASA.

The U.S. House of Representatives approved the legislation. The Senate already approved the legislation, and it goes to President Bush for his signature.

MTSU's science, aviation and teacher training programs stand to benefit from the funding. The university will receive $478,000 to develop programs to recruit high-caliber students and train them to become K-12 math and science teachers.

Another $470,000 will be used for research to better train air traffic controllers and pilots. MTSU researchers will help to determine the best methods to train air traffic controllers and pilots to use the next generation of technology.

MTSU is one of only 14 universities across the country that participates in the Federal Aviation Administration's program designed to train air traffic controllers. (Daily News Journal, Dec. 20, 2007)

Dickson County schools officials wer to meet recently with representatives from Nashville State Community College to discuss possible dual enrollment for students at Dickson County and Creek Wood high schools.

At a recent work session, the school board heard from teachers at DCHS who already are teaching dual enrollment in English, history and speech and art in coordination with the University of Tennessee at Martin.

Dual enrollment allows qualified students to gain college credits through UT-Martin without attending evening classes and having to do extra work.

A dual enrollment honors English class is also available at Creek Wood High School through UTM, and English is provided at DCHS through Austin Peay State University.

Dickson County Schools Director Charlie Daniel said he welcomes additional dual enrollment courses at the high schools.

Currently, Creek Wood offers only dual enrollment English classes. (The Dickson Herald, Dec. 21, 2007)