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The home to students from some 50 countries, Austin Peay State University wants to give the larger community a glimpse into their homelands.

International Night, 6-8 p.m. today in Morgan University Center Ballroom, brings the flavor and culture of 22 countries to APSU.

"It's the biggest variety of international food you'll find anywhere, and, of course, it's all free," says Eloise Weatherspoon, APSU English instructor and organizer of the event.
The home to students from some 50 countries, Austin Peay State University wants to give the larger community a glimpse into their homelands.

International Night, 6-8 p.m. today in Morgan University Center Ballroom, brings the flavor and culture of 22 countries to APSU.

"It's the biggest variety of international food you'll find anywhere, and, of course, it's all free," says Eloise Weatherspoon, APSU English instructor and organizer of the event.

The purpose of International Night, now in its eighth year, is to promote awareness and appreciation of other countries around the world. Countries represented tonight include Austria, Cameroon, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, India, Jamaica, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Nigeria, Puerto Rico, Russia, Spain, Sudan, Sweden and Taiwan.

"The evening will feature food, pictures, artifacts and entertainment from these different countries," says a release about the event. "International Night is sponsored by Student Affairs and is coordinated with the International Student Organization.” (The Leaf-Chronicle, Nov. 6, 2007)

Three artists, also all teachers at Austin Peay State University, have spent their time lately looking hard at a film that is 80 years old.

"Metropolis," the 1927 classic dystopian film by Fritz Lang, has been studied by millions of artists, film students and directors since its release, and remains an icon of the genre.

The Clarksville artists Robb Fladry, Barry Jones and Kell Black have made the bold move of chopping the film into bits and pieces, then reassembling it, while juxtaposing Lang's vision against modern images and original electronic music.

The result is a visual, aural dance, "Metropolis Remix Live," that will be performed for the first time 8 p.m. Wednesday upstairs at Front Page Deli.
Jones says he doesn't think ardent devotees of the original film will be offended by the artists' remix of Lang's masterpiece.

"We're adding to it, we're making comparisons, we're making something completely different," Jones says.

On one huge screen with two smaller screens beside it, the three artists will create a product that, while studied intensely over the past several months, retains the surprise of improvisation. Fladry, Jones and Black will be behind the scenes creating the show as the audience experiences it.

After premiering in Clarksville Wednesday, the 30-minute show will embark on a tour that includes Vanderbilt University, Murray State University, Western Kentucky, Maryland Institute College of Art, University of Richmond, Emory & Henry College and Elon University. (The Leaf-Chronicle, Nov. 2, 2007)