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News in higher education

College tuition is on the rise at state colleges and universities.
Each student can expect to pay about $300-400 extra a year.
For some students, the big concern is the long run since tuition rises each year. Some believe it will get to the point where the average family can't afford it.

"It's still a bargain to go to a Tennessee public institution," said Bob Adams, vice chancellor for business and finance at the Tennessee Board of Regents.

Adams admits the price of a good education isn't getting any cheaper. College tuition is on the rise at state colleges and universities.
Each student can expect to pay about $300-400 extra a year.
For some students, the big concern is the long run since tuition rises each year. Some believe it will get to the point where the average family can't afford it.

"It's still a bargain to go to a Tennessee public institution," said Bob Adams, vice chancellor for business and finance at the Tennessee Board of Regents.

Adams admits the price of a good education isn't getting any cheaper.
"I guess some of the major pressures on our cost are utility inflation and the price of personnel," he said.

This year, tuition for Tennessee public colleges and universities rose by 6 percent.

David Chambers, MTSU associate director of financial aid, said many students need financial assistance.

"Historically our federal and state programs have always been right around 60 percent," he said.

State Sen. Bill Ketron, a member of the education committee, said lawmakers will follow the issue. (NewsChannel5.com, Oct. 23, 2007)

The Tennessee Board of Regents is hoping a new online degree program will help address the state's nursing shortage.

The Tennessee Board of Nursing voted last month to approve an associate of applied science in nursing degree to be offered through the Regents system's online program.

"This program will help meet the current and emerging needs of the workplace for registered nurses, using alternative delivery methods and shared resources," Paula Short, vice chancellor for academic affairs in the TBR system, said in a news release.

"We applaud and thank the Board of Nursing for its vision in approving the program, which will help improve the lives of many Tennesseans."

A federal report in 2004 had projected a shortage of more than 13,000 registered nurses by 2006 and a shortage of 35,000 nurses in Tennessee by 2020, the release said. The American Hospital Association estimates there are 126,000 registered nurse vacancies across the U.S. in hospitals alone.

The program will be offered beginning in Spring 2008 at nine of the 13 community colleges in the TBR system. (The Jackson Sun, Oct. 22, 2007)