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News in higher education

Hopkinsville Community College President Dr. Bonnie Rogers apparently will resign from her position at the helm of the college, HCCs acting president said.

Dr. James E. Selbe noted following an HCC Board of Directors meeting last week that Rogers, who became president of the college in 2000, had given a verbal indication that she plans to retire before the end of the year.
Hopkinsville Community College President Dr. Bonnie Rogers apparently will resign from her position at the helm of the college, HCC's acting president said.

Dr. James E. Selbe noted following an HCC Board of Directors meeting last week that Rogers, who became president of the college in 2000, had given a “verbal indication” that she plans to retire before the end of the year.

Rogers has been on a leave of absence from the college position since October after she attempted to name a new dean of academic affairs at the campus without following standard hiring procedures. (Kentucky New Era, Jan. 20, 2006)

An extensive $18.5 million overhaul of Tennessee State University's downtown Avon Williams campus is under way.

The massive project is designed to recast the downtown campus as a place where adult students can return to school at different levels.

Although students earning bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees already attend school at the Avon Williams campus, the transformation is expected to bring new programs, large workshops and seminars to the community. (The Tennessean, Jan. 18, 2006)

Middle Tennessee State University has 20,448 students enrolled for the Spring 2006 semester, university officials said.

Sherian Huddleston, associate vice provost, said the total is a .89 percent increase, or 181 more students, from Spring 2005. (Murfreesboro Daily, Jan. 18, 2006)

A memorandum agreement signed Dec. 19, 2005, at Tennessee Technological University by seven regional entities pledging their support for a Cumberland Business Incubator may bring Cumberland County one step closer to greater economic growth.

Director of Schools Patricia Ragsdale said a business incubation center would be a fertile training ground for students and help boost creativity.

Dr. Gary Goff, president of Roane State Community College said the business incubator is important to Cumberland County because the county has a lower per capita family median income rate than others throughout the state.

A business incubation center is a birthing place for new businesses and gives business owners knowledge and guidance during their formative years. (Crossville Chronicle, Dec. 27, 2005)

Middle Tennessee State University President Sidney McPhee has pledged to parents that the university-owned Homer Pittard Campus School “is not for sale.”

A week ago, McPhee decided to reject an offer to relocate the school from its 76-year-old building run by Rutherford County Schools on East Lytle Street to Murfreesboro City Schools' Reeves-Rogers Elementary on Greenland Drive.

McPhee and Rutherford County Schools Director Harry Gill Jr. have said they will negotiate renovation needs of the MTSU building. They also talked about entering a long-term contract for the Board of Education to continue providing staff at MTSU to teach about 310 children in grades kindergarten through sixth and train MTSU education majors. (Murfreesboro Daily, Jan. 11, 2006)

A deal has been offered for the University of Memphis law school to move to the downtown post office building on Front Street.

The U.S. Postal Service will sell the former Customs House for $5.3 million in an agreement that was finalized recently.

The U of M, which hired a full-time fund-raiser for the law school, is expected to have to raise the purchase price. A fund-raising campaign reaching out to alumni, law firms, businesses and others in planned for this year. (The Commercial Appeal, Jan. 12, 2006)
The Chattanooga Heart Institute and its president, Paul Farmer, were named recipients of the 2006 Chancellors Philanthropy Award presented by the Tennessee Board of Regents.

The award, presented during Chattanooga State's Spring Convocation, recognizes Farmer's leadership role in establishing and acquiring funding for a new program in cardiovascular sonography at Chattanooga State Technical Community College.

Farmer has been with the Chattanooga Heart Institute for 10 years. (Chattanoogan.com, Jan. 10, 2006)