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Tennesseans who graduate from college in Tennessee are more likely than their out-of-state classmates to begin their professional careers in their home state and add to the state's economy, according to a University of Tennessee study released recently.

While that may seem obvious, the study by UT's Center for Business and Economic Research offers data for the first time to back it up.
Tennesseans who graduate from college in Tennessee are more likely than their out-of-state classmates to begin their professional careers in their home state and add to the state's economy, according to a University of Tennessee study released recently.

While that may seem obvious, the study by UT's Center for Business and Economic Research offers data for the first time to back it up.

"We definitely didn't have the numbers," lead author and economist Bill Fox said. "There may have been some (who) thought that people tend to stay here, but nobody had actually been able to look at it with information on both graduates and workers in Tennessee."

Fox's 18-page study, the first in a planned series in cooperation with the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and Tennessee Department of Labor, could bolster arguments for increasing state support for public colleges and universities. (Kingsport Times News, April 17, 2007)

A proposed tuition break would give eligible University of Tennessee-Chattanooga students who live just across the Tennessee state line in Georgia and Alabama a 75 percent discount on out-of-state tuition.

The new "regional tuition rate" initially would apply only to undergraduate juniors and seniors who live in Catoosa, Dade, Fannin, Murray, Walker and Whitfield counties in Georgia and Jackson County in Alabama.

Dr. Roger Brown, UTC chancellor, said he will ask the UT board of trustees in June to approve the proposal, which if passed would be implemented in the fall.

"We have gotten lots and lots of calls and letters from residents of those counties who really want to come to Chattanooga," Brown said.

If the plan as now structured proves successful, eligibility will be expanded to include freshmen, sophomores and graduate students, he said. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, April 15, 2007)