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News in higher education

The University of Tennessee is looking west of the campus for its growth.
UT officials have their eye on a 200-acre tract of land for a proposed Cherokee campus, which would prioritize science and engineering research and eventually provide up to 2 million square feet of new building space.

The Cherokee campus would sprawl alongside the Tennessee River and Alcoa Highway and is currently home to the UT dairy farm, which is slated to move to Blount County.
The University of Tennessee is looking west of the campus for its growth.
UT officials have their eye on a 200-acre tract of land for a proposed Cherokee campus, which would prioritize science and engineering research and eventually provide up to 2 million square feet of new building space.

The Cherokee campus would sprawl alongside the Tennessee River and Alcoa Highway and is currently home to the UT dairy farm, which is slated to move to Blount County.

The new campus also might include private research ventures and partnerships that could spur regional economic development.

Fundamentally, the farm site is essential to UT's growth, according to Loren Crabtree, UT chancellor.

The university is in the initial planning stages of developing the new campus, according to UT's Office of Media Relations. (Knoxville News-Sentinel, March 6, 2007)

The staff of the Upper East Tennessee Forensic Center at East Tennessee State University's Quillen College of Medicine recently moved into a newly renovated building on the Veterans Affairs Medical Center Campus in Johnson City.

While that is good news for the staff, it is better news for Northeast Tennessee law enforcement and emergency medical officials who depend on the center to complete autopsies of murder victims and other unattended deaths, officials say.

Greene County Medical Investigator Ray Crum said 46 autopsies were performed at the old ETSU facility on bodies submitted by Greene County authorities during 2006. That was 10 more autopsies than in 2005.

He said that, currently, it takes between 60 and 90 days for autopsy reports to be completed, depending on the complexity of the case. (Greeneville Sun, March 2, 2007)

Motlow State Community College had the highest percentage increase for its enrollment this spring of any college in the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) system, said Greer Alsup, director of admissions and records.

Motlow's 13.74 percent increase also set a record for the college.

The Spring 2003 semester, when 3,374 students were enrolled, previously held the record for spring enrollment at Motlow. This spring, enrollment reached an all-time high of 3,660 students, which is 442 students more than in Spring 2006. The numbers reflect also a 10.74 percent increase in full-time enrollment (FTE), the formula on which state funding for the college is based.

All four Motlow locations -- Moore County, McMinnville Center, Fayetteville Center and Smyrna Teaching Site -- experienced gains in enrollment this semester. Recording the largest percentage increase is the Smyrna Teaching Site, where 991 students are taking classes, a 32.66 percent increase over last spring. (Shelbyville Times-Gazette, March 8, 2007)

After a two-month search, Haskell Indian Nations University has hired a new president.

Linda Sue Warner, associate vice chancellor for academic affairs for the Tennessee Board of Regents, will become president of the school April 2.

Thomas Dowd, director of the Bureau of Indian Education, made the final selection.

The appointment brings Warner, a member of the Comanche Nation, back to Lawrence.

She previously has served as a staff member at Haskell and a graduate instructor at the University of Kansas.

Before teaching at Kansas, Warner worked for 18 years for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, while earning a master's degree in education from Pennsylvania State University and a doctorate from Oklahoma University. (The Associated Press, March 8, 2007)