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Austin Peay State University is ranked No. 19 among top associate degree producers in the U.S., according to a 2006 top 100 special report published by Community College Week.

Austin Peay was the only four-year institution in Tennessee noted on the list, based on data compiled by the U.S. Department of Education. APSU joins five other four-year U.S. colleges and universities on the rankings.

Roane State Community College was designated the nations No. 1 associate program producer. Austin Peay State University is ranked No. 19 among top associate degree producers in the U.S., according to a 2006 top 100 special report published by Community College Week.

Austin Peay was the only four-year institution in Tennessee noted on the list, based on data compiled by the U.S. Department of Education. APSU joins five other four-year U.S. colleges and universities on the rankings.

Roane State Community College was designated the nation's No. 1 associate program producer.
Southwest Tennessee Community College is No. 4; Cleveland State Community College, No. 7; Nashville State Technical Community College, No. 9; and Columbia State Community College, No. 13.

In an attempt to increase minority enrollment, the University of Tennessee is providing a new scholarship that will be available to students from 35 selected, majority black high schools in Tennessee.

The scholarship, called Tennessee Promise, is available to students in the fall of 2007 and pays up to $5,800 a year for tuition.

Like the University of Memphis' new scholarship geared toward students of "underrepresented ethnic populations" and first-generation college students, the UT scholarship also attempts to replace one that ended this year with the 38-year-old Geier desegregation lawsuit.

The state-funded Geier scholarship was designed to help bring racial parity to Tennessee colleges after the 1968 lawsuit brought by Rita Geier charged segregation and discrimination.
The lawsuit officially ended last month, along with the scholarship. However, Geier scholarship students will continue to receive the funds until they graduate.

While the University of Memphis created a scholarship that attracts minority students without discriminating exclusively by race, UT took a different approach, offering a scholarship to all students. as long as they are enrolled in the target schools. (The Associated Press, Nov. 6, 2006)

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga has received the following grants:

$99,889 from the Freeman Foundation to direct the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA) in Tennessee, providing two seminars for secondary educators.

$136,972 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to implement the Pathways Program, a mentorship program for children of prisoners in Hamilton County.

$4,800 from the Chattanooga Housing Authority to fund activities at the WesTech Community Technology Center, where Westside residents gain access to computer hardware and software and technology training activities to increase educational and employment opportunities available to community members.

$149,875 from the U.S. Geological Survey to support research activities for the National Biological Information Infrastructure Southern Appalachian Information Node. (http://www.aascu.org/at-aascu.htm, Nov. 1, 2006)

The University of Memphis will host a group of Chinese researchers, engineers and government administrators who are studying the U.S. waterway system.

The 20 professionals will be in Memphis as part of a study tour sponsored by the China Ministry of Communication. The group will hear presentations about power generation, flood control, environmental concerns and the economics of waterways. (http://www.aascu.org/at-aascu.htm, Nov. 1, 2006)