Go back

News in higher education

Area college administrators said the newly formed National Commission on the Future of Higher Education should guard against the creation of No Child Left Behind-type regulations for colleges.

"It could be detrimental if what youre doing is setting one-size-fits-all measurements, said Dr. Roger Brown, chancellor of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. We should allow universities to set the terms of how theyre going to measure how much value is added to a students education. If that became a federal prescription, I would be worried.
Area college administrators said the newly formed National Commission on the Future of Higher Education should guard against the creation of No Child Left Behind-type regulations for colleges.

"It could be detrimental if what you're doing is setting one-size-fits-all measurements,” said Dr. Roger Brown, chancellor of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. “We should allow universities to set the terms of how they're going to measure how much value is added to a student's education. If that became a federal prescription, I would be worried.”

The commission, formed in September by U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, met last week in Nashville as part of a five-city national tour. In each city, the panel will gather input from regional educators on four issues: accountability, affordability, access and quality. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, Dec. 5, 2005)

East Tennessee State University was granted approval Friday to offer in-state tuition rates to students from eight counties that border Virginia and North Carolina.

The Tennessee Board of Regents, meeting at Walters State Community College in Morristown, approved the plan in recognition of the Johnson City school's role as a “regional university.”

“For many years, ETSU has sought a financially attractive way to meet the needs of out-of-state students in our service area,” ETSU President Paul Stanton said.

ETSU will offer in-state tuition next fall to students from Avery, Madison, Mitchell, Watauga and Yancey counties in North Carolina and Lee, Scott and Washington counties in Virginia.

The tuition break is substantial. Tennessee undergraduates pay $3,678 a year, compared with $9,312 a year for out-of-state students. (The Associated Press, Dec. 2, 2005)

Dyersburg State Community College has received the highest score in the institution's history for student, faculty and staff performance, according to information released by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

Public colleges and universities across the state are evaluated annually by the THEC, and the outcome of the report is linked directly to the dollars the institution receives the upcoming year.

Dr. Karen Bowyer, president of Dyersburg State, said, “Dyersburg State received a score of 99 out of a possible 100 points, which is the highest DSCC score since the THEC began the evaluations in 1980. Last year, DSCC received a score of 92. (Lake County Banner, Dec. 8, 2005)

The College Center building at Walters State Community College in Morristown has been named the Jack E. Campbell College Center.

Campbell, a native of Johnson City, was president of Walters State for 31 of the college's 35-year history. He serves as president emeritus of Walters State, having retired as president in June.

When he was named president in 1974 at the age of 35, Campbell was one of the youngest college presidents in the country.

The College Center was the first building constructed at Walters State, opening in the fall of 1971. It houses administrative services, student support services, classrooms, an assembly hall, gymnasium, bookstore and cafeteria. (Mountain Press, Dec. 6, 2005)