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News in higher education

A federal judge has dismissed a discrimination lawsuit filed against Austin Peay State University.

Federal Magistrate Joe B. Brown granted the University a summary judgment dismissing claims made by Laverne T. Walker, former affirmative action program director at APSU.

Walker filed a complaint in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee, Nashville, claiming that when President Sherry Hoppe was appointed in March 2000, Walker was subjected to a hostile workplace, according to court records.
A federal judge has dismissed a discrimination lawsuit filed against Austin Peay State University.

Federal Magistrate Joe B. Brown granted the University a summary judgment dismissing claims made by Laverne T. Walker, former affirmative action program director at APSU.

Walker filed a complaint in U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee, Nashville, claiming that when President Sherry Hoppe was appointed in March 2000, Walker was subjected to a hostile workplace, according to court records.

Walker was terminated July 18, 2002, after she was informed her job was being restructured, records show.

Brown wrote Walker's claims were dismissed because she did not file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission within the allotted 300 days.

Walker's attorney, Charles Dupree of Chattanooga, said he has filed an appeal to that ruling. (The Leaf-Chronicle, Sept. 19, 2006)

The University of Tennessee system unveiled a marketing strategy last week.

It uses a new logo and TV commercial playing off words that contain its UT acronym. The campaign called "FUTURE" comes as the statewide university continues the silent phase of a $1 billion fund-raising campaign.

The UT logo created in 1986 with the tops of the letters forming the shape of the state of Tennessee will become more prominent. The new ad uses the logo to help spell the words reputation, neutrons, sleuth and future. (www.wate.com, Sept. 19, 2006)

Tennessee's community college system may be a "diamond in the rough" for improving the state's graduation rates and for developing a more competitive work force, Gov. Phil Bredesen said recently.

Bredesen has outlined plans to offer free community college tuition to students who score at least a 19 on the ACT, creating course work tailored to job-specific skills like retail management and adding a fifth year of high school for students who want to earn an associate degree.

The community college proposals could be introduced in next year's legislative session. (Knox News, Sept. 18, 2006)

East Tennessee State University's College of Pharmacy has filled its inaugural class of students scheduled to begin work in January.

“We have 70 students who have been extended offers for the inaugural class, and 70 have accepted those offers,” Pharmacy Dean Larry Calhoun said.

Receiving those 70 acceptances was the latest milestone for the fledgling college as it moves toward seeking provisional accreditation in January and starting classes that same month. (Johnson City Press, Sept. 17, 2006)

Scientists uncovered a second fossil of a red panda species first discovered at the Gray Fossil Site two years ago. Researchers from East Tennessee State University found a lower jawbone from a red panda of the Pristinailurus bristoli species last week.

The species was discovered in January 2004 when ETSU researchers found a panda tooth and other skeletal fragments. Only the second panda fossil found on the continent, the remains turned out to be a previously unknown species in the red panda family. (New York Times, Sept. 21, 2006)