Go back

News in higher education

Three years after East Tennessee State University disbanded its football program to save money, the university announced recently that a task force would study what it takes to bring it back.

The 10-member panel was created after a group of interested alumni and football supporters met with university President Paul Stanton.
Three years after East Tennessee State University disbanded its football program to save money, the university announced recently that a task force would study what it takes to bring it back.

The 10-member panel was created after a group of interested alumni and football supporters met with university President Paul Stanton.

The group will consider the start-up costs for equipment and facilities, such as how football demands would fit into a 10-year facilities plan adopted by the university. Football's impact on Title IX funding for women's programs would have to be considered.

ETSU played its last football game in November 2003. The Division I-AA Bucs had played every season since 1920 except for three during World War II. They last won a league championship in 1969 and their best year in the Southern Conference was 1996 when they went 9-2 overall and 7-1 in the conference.

University officials decided to drop football after several failed attempts at private fundraising and faltering state support. The football program had a $1.1 million deficit in 2002. (Greenville Sun, June 22, 2006)

The University of Tennessee has raised more than $107 million in cash and pledges from donors by the end of May, according to a UT report.

That's more in the first five months of this year than the $98 million UT had averaged annually in giving between 1997-98 and 2004-05.

UT has taken in a total of $264 million in gifts and pledges since Jan. 1, 2005. Several factors may be contributing to the surge in gifts, including that UT is in the early stages of what is expected to be a $1 billion capital campaign. The Athletics Department is in a major building and renovation effort and is raising money for more than $100 million worth of projects. (Knoxville News Sentinel, June 20, 2006)

The University of Memphis will offer the first undergraduate program in the country to incorporate software that turns large quantities of data into useful information.

This fall, the U of M will offer a certificate in data analysis and programming, which incorporates the specific SAS software. The certificate program will require a statistics course and three classes in data management.

There are more than 25 companies in Memphis using SAS, according to U of M officials. (Memphis Business Journal, June 16, 2006)

Patients could have a tough time finding a doctor within a few years unless the nation's medical schools start producing a lot more physicians.

That's according to the Association of American Medical Colleges, which said recently that it wants to see enrollment grow 30 percent by 2015. If that doesn't happen, the demand for doctors may eventually outstrip the supply, the academic group said.

Last year, the AAMC called for 15 percent growth in enrollment, but the group recently said it had taken a fresh look at the problem and decided a 15 percent increase wouldn't be enough to avoid a shortage.

The AAMC is calling for larger class sizes at existing schools as well as the creation of new medical schools. If the nation's medical schools were to follow the group's recommendation, the result would be 5,000 more graduates every year to replace retiring physicians and care for a growing, aging population.

Generally, people require more medical care as they age. But an aging population is only one of the factors likely to lead to a physician shortage, the AAMC said. One-third of doctors practicing today are older than 55 and will probably retire by 2020, the group said.

Compounding the problem is that younger doctors may be less inclined to work the same hours as many older doctors, the group said. (The Tennessean, June 20, 2006)