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News in higher education

Dr. Brian Noland, who crafted the states lottery scholarship program, is leaving the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to head a similar agency in West Virginia.

The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission named Noland, 38, the new chancellor at a recent meeting, according to a news release.

"Ive spent my career preparing myself for something like this, and I am very fortunate to have my dreams come true," said Noland, who will begin his new job sometime this summer.
Dr. Brian Noland, who crafted the state's lottery scholarship program, is leaving the Tennessee Higher Education Commission to head a similar agency in West Virginia.

The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission named Noland, 38, the new chancellor at a recent meeting, according to a news release.

"I've spent my career preparing myself for something like this, and I am very fortunate to have my dreams come true," said Noland, who will begin his new job sometime this summer.

Noland has worked for the Tennessee Higher Education Commission for eight years, serving in multiple roles. He is THEC's associate executive director.

He also helped run the Tennessee Student Assistance Corp. for more than a year when the top two administrators of the state's financial aid organization resigned. During the eight years he also has served as a faculty member at Vanderbilt University, Tennessee State University and Nashville State Technical Community College.

Noland received his Ph.D. from the University of Tennessee and his bachelor's and master's degrees from West Virginia University. (Chattanooga Times Free Press, April 8, 2006)

An internal investigation by Tennessee State University has revealed no wrongdoing or NCAA violations on the part of men's basketball coach Cy Alexander regarding his dealings with D1 Scheduling.

However, Alexander has not been exonerated yet. TSU Athletics Director Teresa Phillips said the university has hired an external organization called The Compliance Group to further investigate the relationship, which was uncovered in an Internet story published in March by CBS.Sportsline.com.

The Ohio Valley Conference also is looking into the matter.

“A preliminary review had no findings of wrongdoing,” Phillips said, adding she was confident in the results of TSU's probe. “But we decided to protect ourselves and coach Alexander by having an external group who does this kind of thing to come in and look closely at all possible matters so we can really put it to bed.”

Alexander is being investigated because the Internet story showed a murky three-way relationship among TSU, D1 Scheduling and Los Angeles Community College. (The City Paper, April 11, 2006)

Despite efforts by the University of Memphis to stop credit card companies from soliciting students on campus, Chase credit card company continues to ignore school policy.
Chase, in collaboration with Subway on Highland Avenue, has continued to run an on-campus promotion promising free food to students who fill out credit card applications.

"Credit card companies are targeting students," said James Williams, vice president of Financial Counselors of America. "We see it here every day. College students who did not know how to handle a credit card are deep in debt."

Because of the fact that credit card companies are actively targeting college students, the U of M and the Tennessee Board of Regents have restricted their access to campus, said Sam Brackstone, vice provost of extended programs.

"We want to protect students," he said. (Memphis Daily Helmsman, April 12, 2006)

A clean energy movement is spreading to college campuses across the Southeast.
“Students traditionally have been on the cutting edge of most of the social movements in our history, and energy is no different," said Nick Algee, coordinator for the third annual Southeast Student Renewable Energy Conference recently at the University of Tennessee.

More than 150 student-activists from the Carolinas, Kentucky, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Virginia and Tennessee attended, swapping stories of success and strategy.

Mountaintop removal coal mining, global warming and the threat to public health from air pollutants all linked to "our dirty energy practices" and reliance on fossil fuels, said Brandon Armstrong of Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro.

"But most importantly," Armstrong said, "it was here that we learned that there is something we can do about it."

Students at Middle Tennessee State recently passed a referendum by a wide margin supporting special fees to pay for green power and energy efficiency on their Murfreesboro campus. So did students at Tennessee Tech, Virginia Tech and the University of Kentucky. (www.knoxnews.com, retrieved April 17, 2006)

Union County schools will receive a $600,000 grant to help students and their families prepare better for college.

The program called "Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs" (GEAR UP) is a multiyear, federal grant program designed to increase the number of underprivileged students who go to college.

GEAR UP Tennessee will provide Union County and eight other participating counties with $600,000 over the course of six years to serve students beginning in the seventh grade. It will continue assisting students through high school.

Also, GEAR UP funds will be used to provide college scholarships to qualifying students in the partnering counties for any public or private institution in Tennessee.

The 2005-2010 GEAR UP Tennessee program focuses its efforts on 10 school systems: Campbell County, Cocke County, Grundy County, Hardeman County, Johnson County, Lake County, Meigs County, Newport City, Union County and Wayne County. (www.wate.com, retrieved April 17, 2006)