Go back

News in higher ed

•Demand for the MBA degree is slumping. More than three-quarters of programs responding to a Graduate Management Admission Council survey reported their applications were down last year, and 41 percent said their applications were down by more than 20 percent. (The Boston Globe/Associated Press, 8/3/04)

•Last year, the number of newly declared computer science and computer engineering majors in the U.S. and Canada fell 23 percent. (USA Today, 8/9/04)
•Demand for the MBA degree is slumping. More than three-quarters of programs responding to a Graduate Management Admission Council survey reported their applications were down last year, and 41 percent said their applications were down by more than 20 percent. (The Boston Globe/Associated Press, 8/3/04)

•Last year, the number of newly declared computer science and computer engineering majors in the U.S. and Canada fell 23 percent. (USA Today, 8/9/04)

•California State University officials say a laptop computer's hard drive with the names and Social Security numbers of 13,000 Cal Poly students and employees is missing. CSU officials say an internal auditor noticed his hard drive was missing. (The Tribune, 8/3/04)

•The University of Phoenix is accepting 18- to 21-year-old students beginning this fall. Although the school insists older students will remain the target customer, it can't ignore predictions that California alone will be short 700,000 higher education slots within a decade. (The Boston Globe/Associated Press, 8/3/04)

•Essay-grading computers are making significant gains in the testing industry. More than 2 million essays have been scored by e-rater since it was adopted for the GMAT in 1999, and the technology is being considered for use in the GRE and the Test of English as a Foreign Language. Experts predict computers eventually will help grade the SAT and ACT, which will add writing sections in 2005. (The Washington Post, 8/2/04)

•CBS News reported on the challenges facing Hispanic women who want to obtain a college degree. These include lack of awareness about college and financial aid, the expectation that daughters will live at home until marriage, and the stereotype that Latin women should rely on beauty to attract a husband. Colleges are reaching them by selling the idea that higher education is part of the American dream, and that these young women can leave home and make it on their own. (CBS News, 8/1/04)

•The 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that a Pennsylvania law banning paid advertisement for alcohol in college newspapers is unconstitutional. The panel said the law placed an unfair burden on student publications and hindered their right to free speech. (Associated Press, 7/30/04)

•When Georgetown University student Kate Dieringer found out that the student whom she had accused of raping her would be suspended rather than expelled, she wanted to speak out but couldn't. In order to learn the results of the young man's campus disciplinary hearings, she had signed a form promising not to share them with anyone but her parents and an adviser. However, the U.S. Department of Education has told Georgetown that this policy violates a federal campus crime law. The ruling is being hailed as a victory for victims at colleges nationwide. (The Washington Post. 7/29/04)

•What's the hottest degree no one has heard of yet? The professional science master's (PSM), which is being called “the MBA for scientists and mathematicians.” Experts predict it will become the 21st century's fastest ticket to the major leagues in business and government. California and North Carolina are considering statewide launches to implement the degree at most campuses. (USA Today, 7/18/04)