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News in higher ed

•Gov. Phil Bredesen named three new members to the Tennessee Board of Regents, including two minorities. The appointees are Agenia Clark, a black woman and CEO of The Girl Scout Council of Cumberland Valley, Howard Roddy, a black man and vice president for advocacy and healthy community at Memorial Health Care System, Chattanooga, and Fran Marcum, a managing partner at Marcum Capital, Tullahoma. Roddy is an APSU alumnus. (Associated Press, 7/24/04)
•Gov. Phil Bredesen named three new members to the Tennessee Board of Regents, including two minorities. The appointees are Agenia Clark, a black woman and CEO of The Girl Scout Council of Cumberland Valley, Howard Roddy, a black man and vice president for advocacy and healthy community at Memorial Health Care System, Chattanooga, and Fran Marcum, a managing partner at Marcum Capital, Tullahoma. Roddy is an APSU alumnus. (Associated Press, 7/24/04)

•A Washington-based immigration group is challenging the new Kansas law allowing undocumented immigrants to attend state universities at the in-state tuition rate. (The Kansas City Star, 7/21/04)

•Ohio State University and local developers are partnering to transform a downtown building into the Columbus Center for the Arts and Sciences. The 200,000-square-foot center will house offices, labs, academic and demonstration space, space for working artists, design studios and exhibit space. (NBC4Columbus.com, 7/20/04)

•Duke University has announced a deal with Apple to distribute 1,650 iPods to first-year students. Duke will get a discount and give them free to freshmen. (The News & Observer, 7/20/04)

•More college admissions offices across the country are examining second-semester senior transcripts in what University of Pennsylvania admission dean Lee Stetson calls the “D scholar search”—the hunt for students who slacked off so much their grades dropped significantly, or who dropped tough courses for easy ones. (The Washington Post, 7/16/04)

•Graduate teaching assistants at private universities do not have the right to form unions, the National Labor Relations Board has ruled, reversing its 2000 landmark decision. (Chicago Tribune, 7/16/04)

•According to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, violent crime such as rape, assaults and kidnappings on the state's college campus was up 21.3 percent last year. The largest jump was in kidnapping, which jumped from one offense in 2002 to 16 in 2003. (The Tennessean, 7/16/04)