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New sinkhole sends local and Nashville media to geology prof for answers

September 30, 2003

Last week when a sinkhole began opening and the street above it fell into the resulting pit, members of the media came scrambling to APSU to talk with Dr. Phil Kemmerly, professor of geology.

In an article published Sept. 25, a reporter with The Leaf-Chronicle quoted Kemmerly extensively about the sinkholes. In laymans terms, Kemmerly explained the ramifications of having karst topography underlying Clarksville, why such terrain makes the area vulnerable and the long history of Clarksvilles problems with sinkholes.
September 30, 2003

Last week when a sinkhole began opening and the street above it fell into the resulting pit, members of the media came scrambling to APSU to talk with Dr. Phil Kemmerly, professor of geology.

In an article published Sept. 25, a reporter with The Leaf-Chronicle quoted Kemmerly extensively about the sinkholes. In layman's terms, Kemmerly explained the ramifications of having karst topography underlying Clarksville, why such terrain makes the area vulnerable and the long history of Clarksville's problems with sinkholes.

After the article in The Leaf-Chronicle, a WSMV-Channel 4 reporter, out of Nashville, telephoned Kemmerly to arrange an interview that afternoon. The story ran on Channel 4's evening news.

Not only did Kemmerly provide insight to the TV station's audience, he put APSU in the newsand imprinted his name as a good source in the future when issues involving
geology arise.

Kimmerly's interview with The Leaf Chronicle was the result of a tip from communication specialist Rebecca Mackey.
Dennie B. Burke