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New class about living, dying using textbook by APSU prof

Austin Peay State University is offering a class titled Living, Dying, Grieving, available in the Spring 2009 semester.

Listed in the catalogue as HHP 4030, Living, Dying, Grieving is a three-hour class offered at 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays.

The course is an elective for students in the Health and Human Performance program but can be used as an elective by students studying social work, nursing, psychology or for anyone interested in learning more about the topic.
Austin Peay State University is offering a class titled Living, Dying, Grieving, available in the Spring 2009 semester.

Listed in the catalogue as HHP 4030, Living, Dying, Grieving is a three-hour class offered at 4:30 p.m., Tuesdays.

The course is an elective for students in the Health and Human Performance program but can be used as an elective by students studying social work, nursing, psychology or for anyone interested in learning more about the topic.

The textbook for the class, aptly titled “Living, Dying, Grieving,” is the first book published by Dr. Dixie Dennis, interim dean of the APSU College of Professional Programs and Social Sciences. The book offers tips, techniques, facts and emotional accounts from various cultures and faiths to aid the reader in mastering a fear of death. Also included are helpful ideas for taking care of the business of dying and encouragement for students to live longer by adding excitement into their lives.

Dennis earned her Ph.D. in health education at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, where she studied death education under the supervision of Robert Russell. She earned a Master of Science in public and community health and a Bachelors of Science in chemistry from Austin Peay State University. She is a certified health education specialist (CHES) and currently serves as vice chair of the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing Inc. Board of Commissioners. Moreover, she serves on the board of directors of the American Association for Health Education and is the contributing editor for the American Journal of Education “Teaching Ideas” column. She has many peer-reviewed and professional journal publications, several of which involve death education.

For more information, contact the APSU College of Professional Programs and Social Sciences, (931) 221-6380. -- Barry A. Williams