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Looking beyond the master's; Hoppe submits letter of intent to TBR for APSU's 1st doctoral program

Its a big first step but one that Austin Peay State University President Dr. Sherry Hoppe is ready to takesecuring the Universitys first doctoral programthe Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership.

In late February, Hoppe sent a letter of intent to Dr. Paula Short, vice chancellor for academic affairs, Tennessee Board of Regents, outlining plans to develop the doctoral program. Since Austin Peay was established in 1927 and opened in 1929 as a Normal School for teachers, it seems appropriate that the Universitys first doctoral degree would be in education.
It's a big first step but one that Austin Peay State University President Dr. Sherry Hoppe is ready to takesecuring the University's first doctoral programthe Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership.

In late February, Hoppe sent a letter of intent to Dr. Paula Short, vice chancellor for academic affairs, Tennessee Board of Regents, outlining plans to develop the doctoral program. Since Austin Peay was established in 1927 and opened in 1929 as a Normal School for teachers, it seems appropriate that the University's first doctoral degree would be in education.

Hoppe contends that the Ed.D. in Educational Leadershipa collaboration of the College of Graduate Studies, College of Professional Programs and Social Sciences and the School of Educationwould attract a range of current practitioners and potential educational leaders.

The program would serve the staff development and leadership needs of local school systems, create professional leadership opportunities in an array of education-related fields and provide a terminal degree for the students who already pursue APSU's Ed.S. degree.

Graduates would be qualified for positions, not only in K-12, but also in higher education and non-profit agencies. The proposed program would deliver courses online, on site and a combination of both. A consultant from the University of Missouri was on campus recently to assist the University in its plans for the new degree.

According to Hoppe's letter of intent to TBR, the projected date for submission of the full proposal is Fall 2007 with hopes that the matter could be brought to the vote of TBR at its September 2008 meeting, followed by approval of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), APSU's accrediting body, and the Tennessee Higher Education Commission (THEC).

If approved by SACS, TBR and THEC, the projected date for implementation of the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership is May 2009, allowing time for recruitment of faculty, which is a necessary component of the proposal.

Hoppe said, “We have reason to believe our proposal will be accepted since the specified focuseducational leadershipwould fill a need in the educational-leadership spectrum without competing with educational doctorates offered by other TBR universities.”

For more information, telephone Dr. Carlette Hardin, interim director of the School of Education, at (931) 221-7697 or Dr. Charles Pinder, dean of the College of Graduate Studies, at (931) 221-7415. -- Dennie B. Burke