Go back

Jator recipient of 2009 Richard M. Hawkins Award

Every year, Austin Peay State University bestows the Richard M. Hawkins Award on a faculty member who has demonstrated exceptional scholarly and creative behavior, and this years recipient, mathematics professor Samuel Jator, is no exception.

Jator is currently conducting groundbreaking work in developing a new method to solve higher order differential equations, which, someday, could find numerous applications and change the face of mathematics.
Every year, Austin Peay State University bestows the Richard M. Hawkins Award on a faculty member who has demonstrated exceptional scholarly and creative behavior, and this year's recipient, mathematics professor Samuel Jator, is no exception.

Jator is currently conducting groundbreaking work in developing a new method to solve higher order differential equations, which, someday, could find numerous applications and change the face of mathematics.

He's a frequent invited speaker to organizations such as the American Mathematical Society and the International Conference on Mathematical Sciences, and last year alone, he had six papers published in respected scholarly periodicals, including The International Journal of Pure and Applied Mathematics.

It may be, however, what Jator does in the classroom that elicits the most praise. According to Dr. Jaime Taylor, interim dean of the College of Science and Mathematics, “Dr. Jator exemplifies the Teacher-Scholar Model. (He) has a long history of involving students in his research efforts.”

Taylor cited specifics of this involvement, stating that since 2001, Jator has had 19 different students present their research at conferences across the country. One year, he required his students to present their research projects at the Tennessee Academy of Science meeting. The results were more than impressive; they were astounding. His students walked away with first-, second- and third-place awards in the student section of mathematics at the meeting.

But oddly, these demanding assignments don't alienate him from his students. Rather, they have the opposite effect.

“His students absolutely love him,” Taylor said. “They consistently tell me he is by far the most demanding mathematics teacher they have ever had, but they are more than willing to do the work he requires because it is meaningful.”

Jator was presented with the Richard M. Hawkins Award during a ceremony on April 29. For more information, contact Charles Booth in the Office of Public Relations and Marketing at 931-221-7597. -- Charles Booth