Go back

Interest rates rising? Survey says perceptions of APSU changing for good

According to a survey conducted by QuickTest at Rivergate Mall, perceptions of Austin Peay among teens in the Davidson, Sumner and Wilson County areas have improved since the same survey was conducted in 2002.

Students were asked to take a five-minute survey to test their awareness of Austin Peay and its attributes, as well as their perceptions of the University.

Ninety-two percent of participants indicated they had heard of Austin Peay, compared to 80 percent last year.
According to a survey conducted by QuickTest at Rivergate Mall, perceptions of Austin Peay among teens in the Davidson, Sumner and Wilson County areas have improved since the same survey was conducted in 2002.

Students were asked to take a five-minute survey to test their awareness of Austin Peay and its attributes, as well as their perceptions of the University.

Ninety-two percent of participants indicated they had heard of Austin Peay, compared to 80 percent last year.

Asked to name the school they would attend if they could go anywhere, most respondents said UT-Knoxville or MTSU. Austin Peay was third on the list, however, coming out ahead of TSU. Last year, APSU didn't appear on the list at all.

Asked whether, in their opinion, Austin Peay was a great school, a good school, an average school or a poor school, 40 percent of respondents said they believe Austin Peay to be a great school, compared to 35 percent last year.

Perceptions that Austin Peay had "lots" of majors, high academic quality and lots of extracurricular and enrichment activities also rosean average of 12 percent.

The perception that Austin Peay is a "cool" school rose by 13 percent in this year's survey.

The number of students who said they would be "excited/happy" to learn they would be attending Austin Peay was up 11 percent, and the number of respondents who said they would probably consider Austin Peay was up 16 percent.

A far greater number of students plan to apply to Tennessee colleges and universities this year, according to the survey. The number of out-of-state colleges to which they said they would apply shrank from 99 last year to 50 this year.

Despite the positive increases, the number of respondents who said they would "strongly consider" applying to Austin Peay was about the same this year (29) as last year (22).

"That means we've still got some work to do," says Debbie Denton, assistant director of marketing and public affairs. "Students' opinions of us are becoming more positive. We just need to get them to the next step, deciding to enroll at Austin Peay."