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Hoppe's expenditures lowest of TBR-university presidents

September 9, 2003

Spending by Dr. Sherry Hoppe for travel, meals and maintaining the president's residence is the lowest of all Board of Regents university presidents, according to a recent audit.

A review of presidential spending, conducted by internal auditors at the request of TBR members and reported in the Sept. 7 edition of The Tennessean, showed that among four-year universities, Hoppe had the lowest expenditures in travel, meals, home maintenance and renovations and overall spending. She had the second-lowest total in entertainment, spending $719.
September 9, 2003

Spending by Dr. Sherry Hoppe for travel, meals and maintaining the president's residence is the lowest of all Board of Regents university presidents, according to a recent audit.

A review of presidential spending, conducted by internal auditors at the request of TBR members and reported in the Sept. 7 edition of The Tennessean, showed that among four-year universities, Hoppe had the lowest expenditures in travel, meals, home maintenance and renovations and overall spending. She had the second-lowest total in entertainment, spending $719.

Her spending in all categories was $24,096, almost half the next largest total, $42,840 spent by Tennessee Tech President Bob Bell.

"These are pretty meager numbers," House Education Committee Chair Les Winningham told reporter Michael Cass of The Tennessee after looking at the expenditures of all TBR schools. "We would assume until proven otherwise that these are legitimate functions and legitimate expenditures. They really don't run up a flag."

Tennessee State University President James Hefner reported $157,728 in total spending for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2002the highest of all TBR universities. That total included $41,000 in expenditures on the president's residence and $42,830 for complimentary tickets to TSU football games, an expense attributed to admissions or athletics in some schools. The tickets are given to high school students, legislators, regents and potential donors to "sell" TSU, Hefner says.