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Hoppe to retire in July

Dr. Sherry Hoppe has announced she will retire as Austin Peay State University president in July.

Hoppe, in a Jan. 12 e-mail to faculty and staff, said she plans to spend more time with her family.

On Jan. 30, 2001, Hoppe, Ed.D., became Austin Peays eighth president by unanimous vote of the Tennessee Board of Regents, succeeding Dr. Sal Rinella. She had served as interim president since February 2000, coming to APSU from a 12-year presidency at Roane State Community College.

History was made when Hoppe became APSU president: Dr. Sherry Hoppe has announced she will retire as Austin Peay State University president in July.

Hoppe, in a Jan. 12 e-mail to faculty and staff, said she plans to spend more time with her family.

On Jan. 30, 2001, Hoppe, Ed.D., became Austin Peay's eighth president by unanimous vote of the Tennessee Board of Regents, succeeding Dr. Sal Rinella. She had served as interim president since February 2000, coming to APSU from a 12-year presidency at Roane State Community College.

History was made when Hoppe became APSU president:
• She is the University's first woman president.
• Along with a female administrator from the University of Kentucky who was named University of Memphis president during the same TBR meeting, Hoppe is one of the first two women to head a four-year university in the TBR — the sixth largest system of higher education in the U.S.
• Within Tennessee, she is the first person ever to move directly from the presidency of a community college to the presidency of a four-year university.

During her APSU presidency, the university has:
• Increased student enrollment by almost 30 percent, exceeding 9,200 in Fall 2006, making APSU the state's fastest growing university for four consecutive years.
• Initiated online education and now leads the state in online enrollments with 10 degrees available totally online.
• Achieved reaffirmation of its accreditation through the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools with no findings.
• Developed and implemented several academic success programs, increasing student success and graduation rates, with a special emphasis on the freshman experience and on minority retention.
• Established an Institute on Global Security Studies.
• Developed three new bachelor's degree programs and four graduate degrees (including master's degrees in both management and military history), as well as 15 new concentrations and 11 new minors, including a dance minor to complement the University's exemplary programs in music, theater and the visual arts.
• Seen construction or renovation of numerous facilities, including historic Archwood, Pace Alumni Center at Emerald Hill, Drew Simmons Fitness Center, Ann Ross Bookstore, Harvill Building, McCord Building, Sundquist Science Complex, Morgan University Center, Hand Village and the soon-to-be-opened University Fitness and Recreation Center.
• Made all academic buildings and several administrative buildings wireless.
• Expanded technology for teaching and learning, including numerous smart classrooms and more than 120 electronic databases.
• Provided streaming video of commencement exercises for APSU and area high schools so that deployed soldiers could see their loved ones graduate.
• Upgraded and expanded athletic facilities, including new seating and jumbotron screens in the Dunn Arena, a new soccer field, new turf and track in the football stadium and an athletic academic center.
• Hosted the Tennessee Titans Training Camp in Summer 2006.
• Returned to scholarship football in the Ohio Valley Conference.
• Opened a Hispanic Cultural Center.
• Improved faculty and staff salaries.
• Helped to lead the effort to secure an agreement for a long-term land lease with the U.S. Army to construct APSU's own $4.7 million education building at Fort Campbell.
• Initiated the APSU Distinguished High School Teacher Award, the only one of its kind in Tennessee, enabling an APSU senior to nominate a high school teacher who made a significant difference in his/her life.
• Launched APSU's first-ever capital campaign that has exceeded its $30M goal one and one-half years before the campaign is scheduled to end, as well as increased grant funds by 80 percent.