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Grant helps APSU train physics teachers

A critical shortage of qualified physics teachers exists in Tennessee, but a $75,000 grant to the Austin Peay State University Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education may help remedy this problem.

For the second year in a row, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission is providing the grant to fund the Physics First in Tennessee program at APSU.
A critical shortage of qualified physics teachers exists in Tennessee, but a $75,000 grant to the Austin Peay State University Department of Teaching and Learning in the College of Education may help remedy this problem.

For the second year in a row, the Tennessee Higher Education Commission is providing the grant to fund the Physics First in Tennessee program at APSU.

The program offers summer workshops for secondary science and mathematics teachers to study for the physics PRAXIS examination. Last summer, more than half the participants in the program successfully passed the physics PRAXIS examination, making them eligible for the physics teaching license.

Dr. Shelia F. Pirkle, assistant professor in the College of Education, directs the program and is seeking applicants. Secondary science and mathematics teachers are encouraged to apply.

Key components of the program include:
• Two weeks of physics problem solving. A review of laboratory activities will take place from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily from July 10-25.
• Scholarships for graduate credit, a travel allowance and a stipend of $750 upon completion for every participant.
• An opportunity to take the physics PRAXIS test at the conclusion of the workshop; registration for the PRAXIS will be covered by the grant.

For more information, contact Pirkle at 931-221-7055 or pirkles@apsu.edu. -- Charles Booth