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Glamour magazine names APSU coed among top 22 in the U.S.

An APSU student has been named one of Glamour magazines Top 22 College Women for 2005.
Tamira Cole, a senior English major from Jackson, was selected from 550 applicants nationwide. You are in the company of the top college women in the country, wrote Lynda Laux-Bachard, an editor for Glamour, in a letter to Cole.

We all are impressed by what you have achieved on your campus and in your community. You have distinguished yourself through your creative talents, energetic leadership and the respect and confidence you inspire in others.
An APSU student has been named one of “Glamour” magazine's Top 22 College Women for 2005.
Tamira Cole, a senior English major from Jackson, was selected from 550 applicants nationwide. “You are in the company of the top college women in the country,” wrote Lynda Laux-Bachard, an editor for Glamour, in a letter to Cole.

“We all are impressed by what you have achieved on your campus and in your community. You have distinguished yourself through your creative talents, energetic leadership and the respect and confidence you inspire in others.”

Criteria for Glamour magazine's 2005 Top College Women in America include outstanding academics, outstanding leadership skills and campus and community involvement. Cole has an extensive record of achievements in each of these areas.

She was vice president of Region II of the National Health Occupations Students of America (HOSA). As HOSA vice president during her freshman year at APSU, Cole logged 3,000 miles across the United States as a speaker and leadership coach. In recognition of her outstanding leadership and service to National HOSA, a plaque honoring Cole was hung in her high school.

Among many initiatives, Cole was the founder and creator of ACTIVE ACES and BOOK BUGS programs for 4-H youth in Jackson. As a result of such outstanding work, she became the first 4-H member from Tennessee ever elected to the National 4-H Council Board of Trustees.

Her leadership at APSU is reflected in her selection as chief justice of the Student Government Association Student Tribunal and president of the Residence Hall Government. She also is a Governors Ambassador and a member of the President's Roundtable. Among her initiatives, she is a charter member of the Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance.

Cole became he first African-American member of the APSU chapter of Chi Omega Women's Fraternity in its 32-year history. She also made history as the first APSU student ever to be named to a USA Today All Academic Team.

Since August 2002, Cole has volunteered more than 1,000 hours in community service. For her work on behalf of others, she received the 2004 Tennessee Higher Education Harold Love Outstanding Community Service Award. According to Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Barbara Phillips, Cole contributed her substantial Love Award cash prize to various charities. Phillips cited this as “just one example of Tamira's interest in helping others.”

Cole has been published in the National HOSA magazine, and her column, “College Diary 101,” runs in her hometown newspaper. She has been interviewed by Seventeen magazine, and her PowerPoint presentation on obesity was one of several used as a 2004 National HOSA Education Symposium piece for more than 4,000 delegates. Cole has been a featured speaker to audiences of 100 to 5,000 in several states.
She is a student leader for ASTAR, a pre-collegiate summer camp for African American high school students, serves as a summer orientation leader for incoming new students and has been a group leader and a member of the AP Day Parents Panel.

A magna cum laude Dean's List scholar, Cole has been tapped to Gamma Beta Phi National Honor Society, Sigma Tau Delta International Leadership Honor Society, National Scholars Honor Society, Order of Omega National Greek Honor Society and Omicron Delta Kappa National Leadership Honor Society.

Among many letters of recommendation to Glamour, Dr. Mickey Wadia, professor of English, wrote, “I believe (Tamira) embodies the spirit of the 21st century young African-American woman who, like President Kennedy said in his inaugural address … is less interested in what the country can do for her, but in what she can do for her country.”

Wadia went on to say that Cole's “special charm is that she does not flaunt her many accomplishments; instead, she has a quiet grace about her that stems from an honest and genuine pleasure derived from volunteering her service and time so that others may benefit and succeed.”
—Dennie Burke