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Forensic science students to investigate “crime scene”

What would lead a veteran of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to commit a crime? For Joe Minor, the answer is APSUs new Forensic Science course.

On Tuesday, Jan. 25, Forensic Science Instructor Minor will create a mock crime scene, initiating a semester-long crime science investigation. Students will investigate the scene from 5:30-8:30 p.m. in the Sundquist Science Complex, Room E-305.

An APSU alumnus, Minor says he hopes the realistic nature of the study will intrigue students.
What would lead a veteran of the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to commit a crime? For Joe Minor, the answer is APSU's new “Forensic Science” course.

On Tuesday, Jan. 25, “Forensic Science” Instructor Minor will create a mock crime scene, initiating a semester-long crime science investigation. Students will investigate the scene from 5:30-8:30 p.m. in the Sundquist Science Complex, Room E-305.

An APSU alumnus, Minor says he hopes the realistic nature of the study will intrigue students.

“The evidence from the APSU crime scene will lead the students through a typical crime lab, where they will learn how science can solve this crime,” he says.

“As they follow their evidence from the crime scene to the crime lab, I hope they will be eager to learn about the scientific methods employed in the analysis of evidence, and have an appreciation and understanding of the science in forensic science.”

Though it is not a lab course, Minor says students will receive forensic reports on the evidence first encountered at the crime scene and perform some lab techniques in class, including fingerprint detection methods, bloodstain testing and DNA comparisons.

The course, which is part of the University's newly developed forensic chemistry minor, is offered only on the main campus.

For further information, telephone (931) 221-7626.
—Terry Stringer