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Federally funded grants provide educational programs for disadvantaged students

July 23, 2003

With state funds for higher education declining, government grants, like private gifts, are becoming increasingly important.

Austin Peay officials recently received notification of several continuation grants, according to Dr. Timothy Sweet-Holp, APSU director of grants and sponsored programs.

The High School Upward Bound Program, housed at APSU, has been awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Education in the amount of $346,375 for Sept.1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2004.
July 23, 2003

With state funds for higher education declining, government grants, like private gifts, are becoming increasingly important.

Austin Peay officials recently received notification of several continuation grants, according to Dr. Timothy Sweet-Holp, APSU director of grants and sponsored programs.

The High School Upward Bound Program, housed at APSU, has been awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Education in the amount of $346,375 for Sept.1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2004.

Under the direction of Marsha Lyle-Gonga, the High School Upward Bound Program is for qualified, disadvantaged high school students in Montgomery County. Staff members assist them in pursuing a post-secondary education by providing basic skills and motivational development, tutoring, counseling and post-secondary orientation.

The Veterans Upward Bound Program, with offices at APSU, received a U.S. Department of Education grant of $303,811 for Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2004.

The Veterans Upward Bound Program, under the leadership of Dr. Arthur Neal, provides educational support for all veterans who are educationally or economically disadvantaged. VUB participants receive free services in refresher instruction, career guidance and computer services.

The Tri-County Upward Bound Program, which operates out of APSU offices, received a U.S. Department of Education grant of $234,624 for Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2004.

Dan Botula is the project director for the Tri-County Upward Bound Program, which serves qualified, disadvantaged youth from Cheatham, Houston and Stewart counties. Participants are encouraged to pursue a post-secondary education during a six-week summer residential program at APSU that emphasizes academics and cultural and social enrichment.

The Student Support Services Program at APSU, under the leadership of Jennie Preston-Sabin, project director, received a $247,607 grant from the U. S Department of Education for Sept. 1, 2003-Aug. 31, 2004.

Designed for first-generation, financially disadvantaged college students, the Student Support Services Program is charged with fostering a climate of success for qualified participants to increase the likelihood of their retention through graduation.

According to John Johnson, director of the Clarksville/Ft. Campbell Educational Opportunity Center, the EOC received $355,620 from the U.S. Department of Education.

Sponsored as a free community service by APSU, the goal of the EOC is to provide information and assistance for people enrolled in college/training programs. Working in cooperation with a variety of public and private organizations, members of the EOC staff identify and assist eligible people interested in pursuing education beyond the high school level.

To serve the entire area better, the EOC has Outreach Centers in Dover and Hopkinsville, Ky.

These five programs are called TRIO programs, and each exists locally because of efforts of APSU staff to secure federal funding to provide assistance to different groups of disadvantaged people who could benefit from a college degree.

For more information about each TRIO program, go to www.apsu.edu, click on Index and scroll to the desired program listing and click on that, or contact Sweet-Holp at 7881.