Go back

‘Devil or Angel?' print invitational features 5 Tennessee print studios

Austin Peay State University presents Devil or Angel? an exhibition featuring student, professional fine art and commercial print posters generated by APSUs Goldsmith Press and Rare Type Collection, and other printers.

The opening reception will be 7-8:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 27 at APSUs Trahern Gallery, and the exhibit will continue through March 26. The opening will be preceded with a gallery walk-through and discussion with artists and printers at 6 p.m.
Austin Peay State University presents “Devil or Angel?” an exhibition featuring student, professional fine art and commercial print posters generated by APSU's Goldsmith Press and Rare Type Collection, and other printers.

The opening reception will be 7-8:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 27 at APSU's Trahern Gallery, and the exhibit will continue through March 26. The opening will be preceded with a gallery walk-through and discussion with artists and printers at 6 p.m.

Cindy Marsh, professor of art and director of The Goldsmith Press and Rare Type Collection, says, “The ‘printer's devil' is a Renaissance term that refers to something that becomes a thorn in the printer's side. Sometimes it refers to an apprentice who is making a lot of mistakes and sometimes it refers to a stray mark of ink that reappears on each printed page.”

Marsh adds, “An angel, of course, is a divine messenger. So the question to ask is, ‘Where do each of the five Tennessee print studios represented in this exhibition fall on the divinity scale?'”

Letterpress printing has been around since 1450, and it has been in North America since the 1600s. The letterpress tradition is rooted deeply in Tennessee.

“The literary traditions of the Fugitives, the hand-built publications of 19th century utopian societies, the Cherokee newspaper and rollicking country music billboards adorn our cultural landscape,” says Marsh.

Other printers will include the Memphis College Art Press, Hatch Show Print in Nashville, The Tulip Polar Press at Middle Tennessee State University and The Isle of Printing in Nashville.

“‘Devil or Angel?' will take a closer look at five Tennessee print studios rooted in similar traditions but stepping out in all directions,” says Marsh.

The exhibition is free and open to the public.

The Trahern Gallery is open 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Saturday; and 1-4 p.m., Sunday.

For more information about the exhibit, telephone Bettye Holte, associate professor of art and director of APSU galleries, at (931) 221-7334. — Crissy Laubach-Young