Go back

Current News in Higher Ed

•Education Secretary Margaret Spellings has joined Rep. John Boehner in asking Congress to close a loophole that lets lenders claim a 9.5 percent government subsidy on certain student loans. The practice, known as recycling, allows lenders to use the income from loans that receive the 9.5 percent subsidy to make new loans that then receive the subsidy, too. (The New York Times, 7/11/05)
•Education Secretary Margaret Spellings has joined Rep. John Boehner in asking Congress to close a loophole that lets lenders claim a 9.5 percent government subsidy on certain student loans. The practice, known as recycling, allows lenders to use the income from loans that receive the 9.5 percent subsidy to make new loans that then receive the subsidy, too. (The New York Times, 7/11/05)

•Many college admissions officers are supporting the “gap year” trend, where students take off a year between graduating high school and starting college. Experts say that as the admissions process gets more stressful, the case for a gap year gets stronger. (Associated Press, 7/11/05)

• Would-be donors to colleges should brace for sticker shock in an unusual place: The cost of creating scholarship funds at some schools is soaring. Last week, the minimum price of endowing a scholarship at Duke University doubled to $100,000. In September, Emory University will double its minimum endowment to $100,000. Duke is encouraging donors to give before the July deadline to take advantage of the lower prices. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette/The Wall Street Journal, 7/8/05)

• Dell is partnering with Napster, which already offers a legal subscription downloading service to higher education, to ease the burden music downloads place on IT networks. The new agreement combines Napster's legal digital music service with Dell PowerEdge 1855 blade servers. Colleges and universities will be able to download music from Napster's library and store it locally on a rack of Dell servers, minimizing impact on their networks. The blade servers take up little space on a network. (UB Daily, 7/6/05)